Senior Project

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All Good Things...End When i Want Them To

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            It’s a bittersweet end to the whole experience. I will miss the bizarre stories and interesting people I got to meet on a daily basis. Originally nervous, I wasn’t sure what to expect when coming in, but I think I ended up right where I was supposed to be. With a less than ideal social experience at Catlin, I loved being in an environment where I felt comfortable. I found people like me, not racially, but personality wise. I finally exhaled; Of all places, I didn’t expect to find peace in a tattoo shop, but being around creative, art-loving, unique people gave me a sense of home.
            My mentor traveled to San Francisco this week for work and family, but the other guys in the shop found plenty for me to do. We had a guest artist from San Francisco come in Monday. He was Black, so it was nice to be able to talk to someone of color in a racial (and gender) dominated profession. I think he specialized in neck tattoos because that is all he had booked for that day. He had worked with Dan in California and came to pay Portland a visit to temporarily escape the fast-paced California life. I heard some interesting stories from him as well. It was also fun to hear the differences between Portland and San Francisco through a tattoo artist lens. For example, many women in Portland have neck and face tattoos than he expected. He also saw the word “VEGAN” tattooed a lot on people (face, head, arms, etc.). Having a fresh face in the tattoo shop is always entertaining.
            Hugging Dan Monday afternoon as our semi-final goodbye really hit both of us that the project was ending. Neither of us expected it to go as well as it had and I think we both liked having me in the shop, each for our different reasons of course. Not wanting the experience to end, I secured myself a part-time internship for the summer so that I can finish up Jerry’s box of designs. I’m excited to be able to continue working there and learning more about tattoos, hearing stories, and figuring out how I can wiggle my way into the business. Talking to Dan, who has many connections, there is a possibility of working in a tattoo shop in San Jose when I leave for college. I’ve got to somehow find a way to learn how to use a tattoo gun so I can put the smiley face on the back of that guy’s head!
            I answered the phone for the first time this week! Movin’ on up! It was nerve racking. I’ll just let Mali or Nick who work the front counter handle that. I am also working on a consultation design. Hopefully I’ll finish it before the presentation Thursday. Dan gave me a concept and references for a lady’s tattoo he will be inking this month. When I’m finished we’ll go over it together and see how well I did. It’s all good practice for me later. It will help me when designing some of my family/friends tattoos.
            Not looking forward to being back on campus, but I can proudly say I have completed senior year and successfully finished senior projects. Go me!
 

Comments

Peace in the Tattoo Shop

Hi Kassi -- Thank you for the wrap-up entry. You received glowing reviews from the guys at the shop, so I know they felt the same way you did about the "fit" of this project. It's wonderful that you have found a passion that you would like to continue to pursue in some form later on. I'm also glad to hear that you got a few different perspectives on the industry and got a lens on how the industry intersects with regional culture, with race, with gender, and with diet (!). I'll be interested to hear about your continued explorations of this art form. Thank you for making this such a successful project. Congratulations -- Brett

Matt Junn Senior Project: Physical Therapy and Internal medicine BLOG 2

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In addition to working with an internal medic, I am also following a physical therapist. On Mondays, Wednesdays, Fridays, I work with Dr. Mir at the internal medicine clinic, and on Tuesdays and Thursdays, I follow physical therapist Jim at Westside Physical Therapy. By interning in both internal medicine and physical therapy, I am able to observe how different areas in health care collaborate. Dr. Mir refers many of his patients to Westside Physical Therapy, most commonly sending patients with cases of diabetes or back and knee pain.

However, unlike my time at Dr. Mir’s clinic, I do not commonly see diabetic patients trekking through a weight loss program at Westside Physical Therapy. The most common case I see at physical therapy is recovery from joint or muscle pain. Many of the patients I have been seeing these past several weeks were sent to PT because, for example, they were in a motorized vehicle accident, had torn a muscle while playing basketball, or had to do knee replacement surgery.

Although the patients are referred to PT for a diverse number of reasons, most everybody has a somewhat similar plan for recovery based exercises. Patients will do both cardio and strength training workouts at PT. A PT patient during a strength building session would first start off with biking for 5 to 10 minutes. They would then warm up a specific portion of the body in order to prepare for the specific muscle training that fits the patient’s case.  Then, the patient would enter a muscle workout, where the PT will guide the patient through various exercises that will help strengthen specific muscles in need of recovery. During cardio, the PT will help a patient keep fit without damaging any of the tissues that are related to the patient’s case. They would start out with a bike session of about 5 to 10 minutes, and then enter into various cardio exercises.

That is the basic gist of what I have been observing at Westside Physical Therapy, and what I have been doing other than internal medicine these past several weeks.

Comments

Great photos!

Hi Matt,

Thanks for the update! I'm glad to read about what you've been doing on Tuesdays and Thursdays. The experience sounds quite a bit different from what you've observed with Dr. Mir. I'm looking forward to hearing more about it on Wednesday. Great photo gallery, too!!!!

Robyn

One more Q from 3-D!

Claudia: What is the single most surprising thing you have learned from physical therapy?

From 3-D Art Class

Hi Matt!

Our 3-D Class has some questions for you:

Eva: Would you ever consider working physical therapy?
Chris: Has this experience made you interested in medical illustration?
Hayle: Have you been doing any art related to your project?
Max: How tall are you?
Elizabeth & Abby: What do you like better internal or physical therapy and why?

We really enjoyed reading your blog and sharing it in 3-D Art today!

Chris & The Gang

To Eva: Physical therapy was

To Eva: Physical therapy was very interesting, and I loved helping patients get through the most important stage of their healing process, so physical therapy could be a career possibility.
To Chris: Yes and no. Yes, because I love drawing, and if I end up becoming highly interested in the medical field, medical illustration will be the perfect job for me. No, because, from what I've seen in anatomy books, every single drawing is highly realistically rendered, but I don't see much freedom of expression in the illustrations. I appreciate art more for the liberty of expressing yourself rather than the ability to draw something successfully.
To Hayle: Other than doodling in my notebook, no.
To Max: 160.02 cm
To Elizabeth & Abby: Both are very interesting that it is difficult to choose one from the other. Both impressed and interested me equally and both are very helpful in having a patient feel better.

Magic Tricks and Tattoos

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Ever thought it was possible to levitate? I didn’t either until watching a guy get his palms tattooed. Originally standing, he slowly rose out of his chair hovering inches from the seat with the angriest look in his eyes. The needle didn’t travel far; only a few serifs and swirls were able to get touched up. The customer had the words “keep calm” tattooed on the palms. He came in originally to get the tops of his hands inked (birds of course since they are so popular). After finishing he decided he should get the faded lettering redone to make them look more finished. After observing what looked like excruciating pain, I have come to the conclusion that the palms might just be the most painful spot on the body to get tattooed. The downside about the palms, or anywhere on the hand for that matter, is that the hands go through so much each day and are constantly being exfoliated, which is not good for the tattoo. The more time it has untouched and left alone, the better the outcome. I also learned that is why knuckle tats and wedding rings on fingers always look bad; tattoos on hands don’t stay fresh for very long.
            I also secured some “skin” this week as possible canvas. The friend of the guy getting palm tattoos offered me his head to experiment on. Well, the palm tattoo guy actually offered his friend’s head space, but his friend agreed. He wants a smiley face engrained into the back of his head. Being in the tattoo shop has definitely increased my desire to learn how to tattoo and now I know I have at least one willing soul to risk their head and let me create art on their skin, permanently. I’m thinking if it doesn’t work out, if I can’t figure out how to put a circular shape on and egg shaped head that his hair will grow over it. Then, when I improve as an artist, I can cover up my own tattoo and make it so much better.
            I’ve learned that Atlas and Dan’s name goes pretty far around here. The shop is known globally and the name holds a lot of clout. The artists are already booked up until September and people come in constantly for walk-ins. The shop is also very friendly because when they don’t have time for a walk-in, they refer the customers to other good tattoo artists in town, which helps the other artist’s business as well. When the shop first opened, it was one of nine in the city. Now that Portland is full of tattoo shops and required a tattoo license from a school, shops have popped up all over the place. Though there are more competitors in the game, I don’t think they put up much competition because Atlas is so well known. I hope I can get my business (whatever that may be) to gain that much respect from people. That won’t be for a while though…
           
 

Comments

Better your friend's egg-shaped head than your own...

Thank you, Kassi -- another great narrative. Those pictures make me wince just to look at.... Hands, eyelids, facial tattoos, etc. -- I don't know how people endure them. It has been a pleasure to follow your adventures. When you accomplish your first tattoo or your art gets used for a tattoo for the first time, I hope you will consider sharing the glory (if the subject agrees, of course).

More great stuff!

Kassi, you sure do write well. I must say your lead sentence intrigued me to keep reading! I can't wait for your presentation. Thank you thank you!

Nichole

Week III with the AD!

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My sole task for Sandy this week was the complete cataloguing of uniforms - an immense task, but one that will inevitably save everyone involved with athletics a few headaches. I began by photographing all of the uniforms I could find in the weight room closet, front and back, and after condensing them all into one document, began to organize them. I paired the home and away uniforms for each specific team with one another so that someone looking at the document could easily find what they're looking for. After pairing up the uniforms, I then set out discovering whose uniforms were whose - whether it be JV or Varsity, Boys or Girls, Middle School or Upper School, every uniform had to be labeled. I am still in the midst of this process as I am typing this. The reason for all of this is so in the future, I can create a large spreadsheet the holds all of the data regarding which uniforms have been turned in and which haven't. Sandy is still relatively new to Catlin, and thus isn't familiar enough with each uniform to know which is which. Hopefully I will be able to have pictures of the uniforms alongside the data, so that anyone can know when tracking down uniforms what they look like, and which ones are missing. That's really all I worked on this week - it was a shorter week and Sandy was also out on Thursday and Friday, which severely limited our interaction. Hopefully I'll have a juicier final blog post, but for now, that's where my senior project is!

Comments

Comments for 3-D Art

Hi Evan,

Our 3-D class checked your senior project blog, and we have some questions for you:

Max: What has been the hardest aspect of helping out with AD?
Zach: How was the track meet?
Eva: Who primally does the work you are doing/ helping out with?
Claudia:Why did you choose to work in the Athletic Dept?
Elizabeth & Abby: How many hours do you have to complete?
Hayle:What is it like behind the scenes and not as a player/ student?
Chris: When are you coming to get your 3-D projects?

Week 3: All GLIDEZ On Me

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So week 3 has come and gone, and now its time for another installation of rap pun titled blog posts about my experience working with GLIDER. Unfortunately, I was not able to work with GLIDER nearly as much as I would have liked to last week, because of several events that were out of my control. I worked a full day last Monday in the east side office on a new blog post about trends in employee tenure. Using information from the Bureau of Labor Statistics, the blog post was supposed to demonstrate how workers are working more jobs over the course of their lifetime, and that lack of job security has interesting consequences for our modern economy. I have to draw my own conclusions on what this means for the "millenial/Gen Y" work force. It was a challenging blog post that realistically would've taken all week for me to do well, but several things prevented me from finishing this post last week. After the day off on Tuesday, when the seniors went to the zoo with the first graders, the GLIDER team went to San Francisco to go to a conference called "Under The Radar" to pitch to VCs and companies that might be interested in their service. They stayed there from Wednesday through Friday. I planned to work from home, if not for the AP fiasco (my entire Calculus II class had their BC scores cancelled, so I took my retake test Thursday morning and had to spend my entire day from home on Wednesday studying for it.) For that reason, I was really only able to work on this blog post on Monday and Friday last week, and wasn't able to finish by the end of the week. It might seem ridiculous, but that's life, and I have to roll with it (or GLIDE with it.) I'll be working on this blog post into next week, but I really want to have an awesome last week with GLIDER, so I plan on taking in as much as possible before my time is up and working really hard. At some point in the last week, we'll move out of the dark, gloomy east side office we share with Sprintly into the new, entirely our own office in the Pearl, which I am very excited about. According to Justin and Eli, the conference went really well; everyone loved what they were doing and they had a ton of engaging conversations from people who wanted to get involved. Not much else to report now, but I promise my blog post following the end of my last week will be spectacular.

Comments

creative types and many jobs

Hi Ben,
Please send me your blog post when you're finished - I am eager to read your thoughts. I believe that the jobs of the future will be the result of innovative thinking and innovation constantly requires changing course. The fact that most Millenials will have multiples careers in their lifetimes reflects the need to always pursue new knowledge and opportunities and to constantly develop one's skills. Although less stable, I think of life of many mini-careers seems pretty exciting as long as you're in the driver's seat. See on on Thursday at 1:15 PM.
Meredith

Logo?

Is the photo you posted Glider's logo? I think it is very very good, and I wonder about the creative process behind making it and selecting it. Will we get to read your blog post? Can you embed a link into your Catlin blog? Unfortunately I don't think I will be joining Meredith at her site visit to Glider next week - Thursday is a busy day for me. I hope it goes well and that you finish up strong! I don't know the plans for the senior class for the following Monday and Tuesday, but if you need to put in a few more hours at Glider to cap off your project, perhaps you can work around what is already scheduled on campus...

Week II with Sandy Luu

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This week was a wild one. I fulfilled a lifelong dream, grew a few gray hairs, became a fence-posting master, and suffered temporary deafness due to my proximity to gunfire. Are you on the edge of your seat, chomping at the bit for the next details (especially about those fences)? Read on.

The most intriguing part of this past week, by far, was assisting in the district track meet. It gave me the best glimpse at what an athletic director's job really is, and how he/she interacts with coaches. Essentially, Sandy is like the coach of the coaches. She has to make sure everyone is doing alright and they're happy, but also that they're staying within the rules and treating their players correctly (as well as fulfilling their coaching duties). An AD has to know most things about most sports, not being an expert in any particular discipline but having enough knowledge of the sport's workings to make unbiased and intelligent decisions. This is also important because she's readily accessible on-campus, and is therefore often sought out when there are questions or issues regarding sports. She has to be prepared to deal with these, because coaches aren't always on campus. I have really garnered a lot of respect for Sandy and her line of work. It's not always a thankful job, but it's an absolutely essential one. Even though I'm most likely not pursuing a line of work in her field, I want to apply Sandy's work ethic wherever I end up; keeping everyone happy, but not over-extending oneself and having to retract on your previously overzealous statements (i.e., don't promise what you can't deliver). This is also particularly relevant to someone such as myself who hopes to become involved in international diplomacy one day.

Now, back to the track meet. On Thursday, the day before the meet, I loaded all of the necessary gear into the Gator and drove it down to the announcers booth, where I helped Catherine (Sandy's assistant) to set up the tech hub. In doing so I got to pilot the glorious Gator, if only for a short while. Those scant few minutes were a blur of joy (because really, once you've seen Facilities whirring around in them, their allure is truely ineffable). I was very impressed when the tiny wooden frame with a scoreboard on it was turned into the meet's center for organization, time management, and number crunching. It was obvious everyone involved knew what they were doing. Next, I had to set up the camera at the finish line, making sure that everything was plugged in properly and that nothing was blocking the camera's view.

My task on Friday was to follow and aid Sandy wherever she needed the assistance while also learning her roles in the operation of the meet. I began by setting up the blue and white fences that separate the field events from the crowd. This was a fairly straightforward task that simply needed doing. Afterwards, things started getting dicey, as we soon realized that the starter (i.e., the person who shoots the gun to start the race) was misinformed about what time he needed to be here and had to be rushed to the starting line of the first event. To make matters worse, the system which tracks the start of the race and sends said info to the announcers booth was having serious issues. This was really frustrating to all of us, as it was the most up-to-date system available and it still wasn't functioning. Fortunately we managed to get everything running again before the runners had to wait too long.

That's all for this week!

Comments

Hats off to Sandy, our incredible AD!

It's fantastic that you're noticing not just what Sandy does, but how and why she's doing it, and you're seeing how these skills apply to other careers!

Great Helper

Evan, you did a great job at the track meet. It's always nice to work with someone who is willing to put in the work whenever necessary. Keep up the good work!

TRACK MEET

It was a great day on the track and you were a big part of that success.
What is your next project with Sandy? Putting things away? Making an inventory?
Thank you for your long detailed blogs. i enjoy reading them.
Madeleine
Madeleine

I'm set for breakfast... for the next year!

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This week was very exciting! I knew my way around the bakery and understood the process, so the bakers trusted me to work with the pastry dough a little more. Although my alarm was still set for 4:45, I decided to start waking up to something brighter! I hooked my ipod up to my alarm clock and woke up to Britney Spears’ lovely voice singing her 2000 hit: “Lucky”. With a catchy tune in my head, I was ready to start another day at the bakery.

 
On Monday, I worked with Ruth in the morning because Shiho, my mentor, wasn’t working. She let me do a lot! I watched her make a couple of pastries and helped her make a couple different kinds of croissants and brioches. There are two “bakes” in a day’s work. The “first bake” is around 6 and the “second bake” is at 10. Basically, all the pastries are prepared and baked around these times, so that there are two waves of fresh pastries coming out and the supply on display is refilled. After our first bake, the bakers usually start making fruit tarts, éclairs, or cream puffs. They have a specific number that they’re suppose to have on display and so if more tarts are sold the previous day they have to make more to reach the required amount for the display. So I helped Ruth cut up fruit for the fruit tarts! I cut up a huge box of strawberries. Then I learned how to cut kiwis and a pineapple! It’s actually a lot easier than it looks. I’ve always been a little intimidated by pineapples, because they’re so big, kind of clunky, a little thorny, and so odd. I never knew exactly how to tackle the shape and what angle to go about cutting them. But Ruth taught me and I cut up all the fruit she needed for her tarts. I had to rush out of there though, so I didn’t get to help with their final assembly.
 
I worked with Ruth again on Tuesday and helped her make all of the morning pastries. We finished working with the pastries pretty early, so we were able to start with the fruit tarts sooner. La Provence makes a couple different sized tarts: there are really mini ones, your traditional mini ones, and then the larger 8 inch ones. Sorry those sizes aren’t super exact. Ruth put out the crusts and then I filled each with the vanilla custard. To fill the pastries and tarts, you have to use a pastry-piping bag. Now, I haven’t had a lot of experience with piping bags You know how you get a tart and the custard is nicely “swirled” on top? That’s the work of a piping bag expert. Let’s just say, I’m not an expert yet. They weren’t bad! Ruth said they were great, but unfortunately they didn’t look like the demo she showed me. It takes some expert wrist twirl and then the perfect amount of custard squished out of the bag to create that beautiful tart. Fortunately, I covered all of them up with strawberries and other assorted fruits. Hopefully I’ll have another try at them this week!
 
Wednesday was a pretty easy day. I worked with Ashley, who is actually a baker in training, so we help each other out a little. She asks me how the other bakers do it and she teaches me the techniques she’s figured out. It’s interesting to see the little differences in each other their preparations. For example, they all use something to put on their hands so that the dough is easier to work with. Ruth uses excess egg wash, Amalia uses water, and Ashley goes at it with nothing on her hands. The pastries turn out a little different every day depending on which baker is working. Regardless, everything is DELICIOUS!
 
 
On Thursday, I was working with Ruth again. We made pastries, and I helped out even more. Doing whole trays of croissants and brioches. But disaster struck when we realized we didn’t have any icing for the cinnamon rolls! The delivery truck was supposed to come with a bucket of icing, but the order was lost and we had no icing! Luckily Shiho was there and taught us how to make icing. Baking Tip #1: Icing is easily made in a mixer with powdered sugar and the tiniest amount of water (depending on the consistency desired). You can also add a little vanilla, but Shiho said it doesn’t really make a difference. With the problem solved, I moved on to help Shiho assemble macaroons. They have so many different kinds of macaroons: chocolate, coffee, espresso, raspberry, passion fruit, lemon, vanilla. I can’t remember them all! I had to take out the crumbled macaroons that were still on display and replace them with new ones. I learned from Shiho that it’s good to put out the pastries that came out smaller from the oven, so that the customer feels better when they get a larger one. Shiho has made it her job to help me learn about bakery, but also the managerial and philosophy behind restaurants and bakeries.
 
Friday was a busy day. The bakery’s busiest days are on Fridays, Saturdays, Sundays, and sometimes Mondays. The amount of pastries being made is always larger, so that means I get to do a lot more! I helped Amalia with the pastries, working for the first time with apricot croissants. Then I assembled a couple of chocolate creations for Shiho. I had to glue together a mini Eiffel Tower onto a sheet of chocolate using melted chocolate. It was delicate work. I had to get the tower to lean off the edge a little and then carefully transfer a tray of them to the fridge where they could set. Then I packaged madeleines. Putting eight into a bag, sealing it with ribbon, and putting a La Provence sticker on it. I did a couple of those before I had to leave for ballet!
 
I’ve made it my goal to try every pastry by the time senior project is over, and Shiho has been paying me with free pastries! So far, I’ve tried a bear claw, a raspberry croissant, a cinnamon roll, a walnut roll,  a palmier, and of course their plain and chocolate croissants!

Comments

Hi Maggie

Maggie, I thoroughly enjoyed my visit yesterday at La Provence. It's quite a place! Thank you for being so generous with your time, and please thank Shiho for me. Lunch was delicious, as I had expected. But I am going to have to come back and get some pastries and bread. Thank you for sharing your experience with us and for writing such an interesting and detailed blog. The photos are great, but they make me hungry (ha!). I know it's hard to get up at 3:45 AM so that you can be at La Provence by 5 AM. It makes a long day for you. It is evident that you are having a great experience and that you are learning a lot. Bravo! Roberto

Thanks Roberto!

It was great having lunch with you! I hope you come by and try the pastries, they're delicious!

Amazing!

Dear Maggie,

I'm so delighted to see what a great week you've had.Your blog has inspired me to make some icing, too. Many thanks for sharing!

Robyn

MMMmm

I hope the icing turned out well!

Week 2: Swing down, sweet chariot, stop, and let me GLIDE

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I had a very busy second week working with GLIDER. Between juggling the two projects I've had to work on that I described in my last blog post, Eli was in and out meeting with investors, on the phone with potential business clients, etc. (he even added over two more hours to his work day.) Meanwhile, Justin and Cameron are as busy as I've ever seen them. So I'm glad to be of any sort of help, and I'm learning a lot observing Eli managing this company.

The first project I worked on was helping Eli research and compile a list of businesses with over 100 employees that have been seeded by venture firms that Eli is connected with. I had to find out the names of their CEO, COO, VP of Sales, VP of BD, and their sales operations managers are (which wasn't easy, the information on linkedin often differed with the information on databases like crunchbase and on the company websites.) I think that next week either Eli or I will be reaching out to some of these people to try to pitch GLIDER to them so they can use it in their actual businesses, as an alternative to having to manage their contracts and sign deals the way they currently do.

The second project I've been working on has been helping Justin with content for his blog, The Future Of Work (http://futureofwork.glider.com/). The blog is meant to be a stand-alone project that discusses how "smart enterprise" tools are disrupting enterprise as usual. The premise is that, today, because of how seamless and successful consumer tools like Facebook and Twitter are, workers expect the same quality of performance from the tools they have to use at work. Often times, the IT departments of their work give workers tools that they'd prefer to substitute for technology they are more familiar with, so when workers bring in their own technology to be more efficient to work (BYOD = bring your own device), the IT departments and CIOs can be the last to know. Services like GLIDER that are making work much easier and far more efficient are disrupting entire industries. I spent the majority of last week working on a blog post that discussed this (it'll get published next week), with links to various articles and a big shout out to one of my all time favorite comedies, Office Space. I also helped on a running series called "The Business Setup" that showcases the different technologies that modern businesses use to be more efficient, like Github or Hipchat. I've learned a lot of interesting things by managing this blog, like the "Flesch-Kinkaid Readability Test," which uses a formula that involves ratios between words in a sentence and syllables in a word throughout the text to indicate how comprehensive and difficult the reading is. For example, on a 1-100 scale, a blog post should score above a 50 (fairly easy to read or skim). The text in blog posts can't be like text from Dickens or in Heart of Darkness, which would probably score close to 0, if not in the negatives.

Next week should be a little less busy. Besides the senior/first grade trip to the zoo, the GLIDER team is going down to San Francisco for another tech conference that would introduce them to more VCs and angel investors called "Under the Radar," so I'll be working from home those days. We also move into the new office in the Pearl next week, which I'm excited about (more food options for lunch), so I suppose I'm helping Eli move furniture on Monday.

A quick anecdote about the week: on the second floor of my building, there's a modeling agency and I always see the two women who scout potential models walking out of the building at the same time as me whenever I'm on my lunch break. So they invite me into their office one day after work to have my picture taken and meet their boss, and when I come in to see the open casting call, I literally see some of the cutest girls ever, who aren't even that much older than me. So I come in, everyone's all smiles, I'm making nice conversation with this blond girl on the couch waiting to have my picture taken, when they tell me that I'm too short. (Really hurt my pride with that one.) It's not like I've ever felt any desire to model, but I feel like it would be funny to have girls see my face going into an Abercrombie. Knowing me, the whole thing would be very ironic. Anyway, this story has made for some funny jokes in the GLIDER office, and hopefully I get into more funny encounters in the new building in the Pearl. 

Here's a video featuring GLIDER from the Wall Street Journal: http://live.wsj.com/video/what-does-it-take-to-be-the-next-hot-start-up/B800F8EB-BBAC-4262-A09C-8B9F7316F78F.html#!B800F8EB-BBAC-4262-A09C-8B9F7316F78F

Here's an article about GLIDER from Tech Crunch about GLIDER's launch at Disrupt in NY: http://techcrunch.com/2013/04/29/glider-launches-at-disrupt-ny-with-saas-that-automates-approving-and-signing-contracts-adds-intelligence-to-deal-flow/

In the picture below, Eli is writing something up on the whiteboard and Cameron looks super engaged.


Comments

Heart of Darkness shout-out!

I was glad to read the bit about the readability test, and see some of our brunch conversation make it in your example!

I'm also glad that the project is going well, and that you're keeping such a positive attitude about the stuff you're learning. Way to go, Ben!

And great to see you yesterday!

Nichole

Interesting links...

Hope to be able to read your published article this week. Like Meredith, I would love to be able to hear more specifics about what you are working on, if you can tell us without violatting confidentiality. Do you feel that GLIDER is meeting all the requirements for being a successful start-up, as outlined in the WSJ piece?
And I loved the story about beiing "discovered" as a model!
I plan to come with Meredith on Friday, if I can find a sub for the AP exam I am supposed to proctor!

Project deets

Hi Ben,
I'm looking forward to visiting on Friday at 11. It sounds like a fast paced and evolving environment. I'm glad you are able to help work on developing connections for Glider. I'm fascinated by the readability ratings for blog posts. It sounds like you're thriving and enjoying the start up culture!
Take care,
Meredith

Update on my senior project at the internal medicine clinic with Dr. Mehdhi

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At the internal medicine clinic managed by Dr. Mehdi (the doctor I am interning with), I heard a lot of: “You’re at high risk for diabetes”; “You must walk at least two miles a day”; “I’m sorry, but you’re stuck with diagnosing diabetes for the rest of your life”; “I recommend you fast a couple times a week”; “You’re blood pressure’s very high”; or “You’ve gained weight.” In other words, the majority of the bulk of patients I saw everyday for the past week were overweight. A typical checkup at the clinic would start out with figuring out the patients problems/symptoms, checking blood pressure and lungs, and finally drawing blood out into three different tubes (each relating to a specific lab test). It might sound monotonous, but each patient comes in with a different story on how they deal with their diabetes and weight problems. I saw one patient who told the doctor that he was fasting for ten days straight, once a year, and was also fasting at least three days per week. Dr. Mehdi told him he was being unhealthy. Some other patients seemed to be lying to their doctor, telling him that the bag of chips the patient ate the other day was the only unhealthy thing he ate since they last met. Overall, I have had a pretty interesting senior project so far. (I will offere visual content by the next blog post)

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Week 1

Hi Matt,

I think it's great that you are able to observe so much and get such an inside-view of what it is like to be a doctor. What types of work have you been doing besides observing? What has been your experience on the days when you are with the physical therapist? I look forward to seeing pictures on your next post! Next time, you might add a bit more detail, maybe describe what you do each day. It's great to see that you are finding the experience interesting. Congrats on your first week!

Robyn

No more gold lights for the queen earth

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Hello there Catlin. I totally forgot about the whole blog thing, so here I am, typing away on the desktop computer at my house about my experiences last week.

Anyways, let’s get started.

So, in case you didn’t already know, I’m working with John-Henry Dale over at La Musica Studio. How do I reach this La Musica Studio, you may ask? Well, to find it, all you have to do is get on Belmont and drive all the way to SE 45th. There, you enter the Old Belmont Square (the front gate has been locked every single time I’ve gone so far, so I recommend you enter via the back door), and go down to the basement floor. There, you can easily find La Musica Studio since there’s a big sign that says “La Musica” (if memory serves me right) as well as a large Ableton poster (if memory serves me right again).

Now that I’ve gone over how to get to the studio, I’ll get to what I’m actually supposed to write about: what I did last week. Well, I spent the majority of my time there learning the basics of Ableton Live, and aspects of studio recording. For those who don’t know what Ableton Live is, Ableton Live is a music sequencer/workstation with a strong emphasis on live performance, as it contains several studio instruments as well as support for a large amount of Ableton-created instruments, including the brand-new Push (okay, not really brand-new since it came out in the past month or two). Since it’s a computer program that’s meant to be used as a live instrument, it’s primarily used by electronic musicians and DJs, with a lot of big-name artists using the product, ranging from industrial stalwarts Front 242 to post-rock outfit 65daysofstatic to dubstep poster boy Skrillex to everyone’s favorite robot helmet-wearing French house duo Daft Punk. I’ve always wanted to use it more, but I’ve never gotten used to its interface and have instead preferred Logic’s staff-based arrangement style, so I’ve found this project a good opportunity to learn how to use Live.

Personally, what I found most interesting was the composition style of electronic artists. A lot of electronic music doesn’t have the same melodic sensibilities as a lot of bands I listen to do, and I’ve always wondered how electronic artists come up with their interesting melodies and what kind of obscure music theory they employ, since whenever I write/make/compose/whateveryouwanttocallit a song, it always ends up sounding like Thursday, Sunny Day Real Estate or something from a Kingdom Hearts game. As it turns out, a lot of electronic musicians don’t really use any special kind of theory, as they instead go for a more rhythm-centric approach (as far as I know), employing grid-based instruments such as the aforementioned Push to come up with their melodies and harmonies with less emphasis on what note should go next. I’m thinking of trying out this method in the future, because perhaps my MIDI keyboard usage is shaping the way of how I write music.

Since the first meeting, I've been bringing my cello over to the studio because John-Henry is planning on making a cello/electronic EP or something along those lines. We already had a go at it by using a recording of me playing the main bassline to an American Football song and adding beats and synths to it, but I doubt it'll be used again in the future.

So yeah. That's my first week so far. Below is a picture of part of the workspace. That's Ableton Live on the computer, an analog synth (I believe) on the left, and the Push on the black table on the bottom. Woo.
 

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Live pictures

I love the picture and good first update!

Working in that one place in the gym with Redvines (and Sandy Luu).

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 My first week of senior projects has not been what could be called action-packed, but that's due more to the chaotic nature of the past week than the job of an athletic director. With the recent and upsetting firing of a Catlin coach for questionable conduct, a fair amount of my time had to be spent out of Sandy's office so that she could deal with the situation and those it involved privately. So, no, this will not be the place to get the inside scoop on gossip. However, I still had things to do both with Sandy and without her. 

My most important task for the beginning of my project was to come up with a rough picture of what the Catlin athletic website should look like when it gets re-vamped. I did a lot of research into exactly what makes a sports website present stories fluidly, and how to make the site aesthetically pleasing to the eye. My two-day sports website odyssey left me a bit tired of sports news, but also with lots of ideas regarding the betterment of the webpage. The first thing that really struck me about the majority of the sites I saw was the clutter of it all; it was almost impossible to quickly find scores and game start times amongst the advertisments and annoying drop-down menus. When people come to a site, they come there for a reason: it's not often that visitors peruse. Therefore, making an easy-to-navigate site is what I think should be the first priority. 

Secondly, I noticed some websites made news-reading a lot easier in that they had a scolling slideshow with big pictures and bold fonts that covered the biggest stories in sports for that week. It looks nice, and is a fluid way to present stories. One thing in particular that I thought would be a fantastic addition would be if CatlinSpeak could provide a "2:00 Update" once a week (or so) to cover all the happenings in sports, whether it be outstanding individual performances, wins, losses, whatever. It would be a nice way to stay informed on Catlin sports without spending a lot of your time looking for news. 

After I worked on the website, I got to work organizing the uniform situation. Now, it is a rough task to keep track of every teams uniforms, who has them, and whether or not they have been turned in. My task now is to set up a Google Spreadsheet so in the future keeping track of these things will be a much less anal task. I am looking forward to the upcoming district track meet; it will provide an opportunity for me to see what Sandy's job is in great detail, and also how she set up this large event. 

That's all for now! 

Evan

Comments

Great start!

I love the positive attitude you are bringing to your project, Evan. I'm sure Sandy appreciates your work now more than ever. And I love that "2:00 update" idea, too!

Nichole

'2:00 Update" !

Hello Evan,

That is a great idea especially for some of us teachers. Staying in touch with all sports activities at Catlin Gabel is not easy and this system could facilitate the communication of all results.
Enjoy the upcoming track meet and tell us all about it with pictures.
madeleine

Congrats on your first week!

Hi Evan,

I'm glad to see all the work you've started in your first week! Researching and thinking of ways to improve the Web site is great, and no doubt you'll be busy with organizing the team uniforms in the weeks ahead. Great job! I'm looking forward to reading your next post!

Robyn

PYRO week 1

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This week I had chance to work with Brent Gunter at the Portland Youth Rock Orchestra (PYRO) at their head quarters. Brent Gunter (my mentor) had his office in the main room, and I was in the room next door.

My "office": I put my computer in front of the mixing equipment.

On my first day I was somewhat disappointed to hear that I would not be doing much work with Sandia Crest Entertainment, as the recording was not profitable, and they have a hard time booking acts. So, while I am surrounded by recording equipment, it seems unlikely I will be using any of it.

Instead, Brent has had me focus on working on increasing membership for PYRO. The first two days I helped Brent with his online presence, showing him how to more effectively use the Twitter, the Facebook, and the Youtube page. I have about a month's worth of posts mapped out in advance.

On Tuesday, the conductor, Anna, called in sick. This put us into "panic" mode, as we could not hold rehearsal that night without a conductor. Luckily Brent was able to call in back up, and we had a sub for that night.

In order to make sure that the sub could work, we went to the rehearsal space (West Sylvan Middle School). There I learned about the surprisingly complex world visiting a public school, which required us to check in at the office, get badges, and get stickers.

Once we made our way into the room, Brent set up the mixer board while I did some heavy lifting- moving the drums out of the closet and getting them set up. This included a full kit and the concert toms. Afterwards, I arranged all the chairs into lines, and made sure that each chair had music stand. Practice that night went successfully.

On Wednesday, Brent took me in his truck so that I could learn about canvasing. This involved "cold calling" businesses, by showing up and asking to hang posters. People online call it "guerilla marketing", but Brent made a point of calling it "polite guerilla marketing" as we only hung posters were we were given explicit permission. in some stores, we were lucky enough to find a community board, which would almost always let us hang up our promo materials. Places that didn't have a community board required us to do a "elevator speech" about why they should let us hang things up.

Thursday I made a large list of every Starbucks, Einstein Bros Bagels and Fred Meyer's in Portland, with the aid of the internet. The rest of the day I was sent out on my own to do canvasing at Catlin hotspots. By the end of the day I hit most of my favorite places, and even had a chance to hang up some things on campus.

Friday I spent almost the entire day on my own in Downtown Portland (around NW 21 and 23), hitting shops in the area. While I was generally successful, I encountered more competition for my canvasing here from other cultural groups (bands etc.) and political movements.

Overall, this week I got a solid introduction to the innerworkings of PYRO, and helped with the marketing.

Comments

Thanks for the update Kenny

Sorry to hear there won't be much opportunity for recording on this project, but I was interested to read about the other things you're doing. I'd love to hear more about the kids you're working with: how old they are, what they're playing, what they seem to be getting out of participating in this program. I'll be calling Brent and you soon to set up a site visit.

RE: Tony

During the day I am not working with kids. On Tuesday's I play percussions with the advanced group, but that is not a part of the program.

As for the kids in PYRO, they are age 7-23 guitarists, bassists, percussionists, and orchestral instrumentalists. Brent says that the program offers "the rigor of classical with the excitement"

PYRO week 1

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Week 1

This week I had chance to work with Brent Gunter at the Portland Youth Rock Orchestra (PYRO) at their head quarters. Brent Gunter (my mentor) had his office in the main room, and I was in the room next door.

My "office": I put my computer in front of the mixing equipment.

On my first day I was somewhat disappointed to hear that I would not be doing much work with Sandia Crest Entertainment, as the recording was not profitable, and they have a hard time booking acts. So, while I am surrounded by recording equipment, it seems unlikely I will be using any of it.

Instead, Brent has had me focus on working on increasing membership for PYRO. The first two days I helped Brent with his online presence, showing him how to more effectively use the Twitter, the Facebook, and the Youtube page. I have about a month's worth of posts mapped out in advance.

On Tuesday, the conductor, Anna, called in sick. This put us into "panic" mode, as we could not hold rehearsal that night without a conductor. Luckily Brent was able to call in back up, and we had a sub for that night.

In order to make sure that the sub could work, we went to the rehearsal space (West Sylvan Middle School). There I learned about the surprisingly complex world visiting a public school, which required us to check in at the office, get badges, and get stickers.

Once we made our way into the room, Brent set up the mixer board while I did some heavy lifting- moving the drums out of the closet and getting them set up. This included a full kit and the concert toms. Afterwards, I arranged all the chairs into lines, and made sure that each chair had music stand. Practice that night went successfully.

On Wednesday, Brent took me in his truck so that I could learn about canvasing. This involved "cold calling" businesses, by showing up and asking to hang posters. People online call it "guerilla marketing", but Brent made a point of calling it "polite guerilla marketing" as we only hung posters were we were given explicit permission. in some stores, we were lucky enough to find a community board, which would almost always let us hang up our promo materials. Places that didn't have a community board required us to do a "elevator speech" about why they should let us hang things up.

Thursday I made a large list of every Starbucks, Einstein Bros Bagels and Fred Meyer's in Portland, with the aid of the internet. The rest of the day I was sent out on my own to do canvasing at Catlin hotspots. By the end of the day I hit most of my favorite places, and even had a chance to hang up some things on campus.

Friday I spent almost the entire day on my own in Downtown Portland (around NW 21 and 23), hitting shops in the area. While I was generally successful, I encountered more competition for my canvasing here from other cultural groups (bands etc.) and political movements.

Overall, this week I got a solid introduction to the innerworkings of PYRO, and helped with the marketing.

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