Modern Languages

French

Please Note: Global Online Academy (GOA)

French I - Bridging Comprehension and Communication

This course is designed for new students of French and for those with previous experience who are not sufficiently prepared for French II. Students develop basic proficiency in the four modalities of language learning: listening, speaking, reading, and writing. Developing and improving comprehension through reading appropriate level authentic texts listening to various media sources in the target language engages students with interactive thinking and communicative skills as they respond to oral and written prompts. Strong emphasis on vocabulary acquisition, verb conjugation and grammar essentials is embedded in all tasks at this level. The course is generally conducted in French, but grammar is often explained in English. Students explore personal opinions and feelings, and their family and friends, as they share with others and act in space and time. Students drive their own learning through inquiry, as well as working collaboratively to research and create their own projects reflecting their knowledge and ability. While gleaning new technology skills on French websites, students explore Paris, its neighborhoods, architecture, and historical sites. Students are immersed in French, practice conversation daily, and regularly practice listening, reading and writing skills. Classes are student centered, and games and activities are created around student interests and preferences. Students are immersed in French, practice conversation daily, and regularly practice listening, reading and writing skills. Classes are student centered, and games and artistic activities are created around student interests and preferences.

French II - Receptive and Productive Communication Skills

Engaging in conversations! This course is intended for students who comprehend and interpret basic verbal or written messages and communicate on very familiar topics. The expansion of students’ oral communication, reading comprehension, and writing skills through the study of themes, including some that reflect their interests, is reinforced with regular listening and reading in and outside class in culturally appropriate ways. Key objectives are kept in mind, such as developing linguistic proficiency through performance with increasing vocabulary and the study of short stories which provides examples of the grammatical rules and structures discussed. Students apply their knowledge in written literary forms, discourse, dramatizations, and oral presentations. Collaborative project-based activities engage students in demonstrating personal responsibility for their language learning. Short films expose students to the various French-speaking cultures while helping them develop comprehension skills and sensitivity in relation to cultural issues. Students are strongly encouraged to use the target language in the classroom, as the course is mostly conducted in French. Writing competencies are expected to follow the French writing formats.

French III - Conversation and Composition

Building on the skills learned in French II, students learn to narrate in all of the major timeframes, to describe people and places, and to communicate with increased confidence about topics such as home, school, work, health, and current events. Students increase their accuracy and create more sophisticated language by using conjunctive adverbs, simple and complex relative pronouns, and the conditional and subjunctive modes to communicate in cohesive, paragraph-length discourse. Students select topics for research; write short stories, poems, letters and summaries; and engage in conversation informally and through discussions, debates, round table discussions and skits. Students learn to calibrate the register and tone of their communicating to reach their audience. In the spring, students embark on the study of French literature, including letters of Madame de Sévigné, fables of Jean de la Fontaine, and modern rewritings of these seminal texts. Students complete the year by writing and illustrating fables of their own.

French IV - Literature, Culture and Civilization

Building on the skills acquired in French III, this course delves into French and Francophone literature, culture and civilization of the 20th and 21st centuries. Source materials include short stories, poems, plays, novels, songs, and films. They include works from the following literary currents: visual poetry, existentialism, the theater of the absurd, la Négritude, the new novel, l’écriture feminine and recent Francophone works. Students study geography, history and developments in the arts, sciences, and philosophy to gain a deeper understanding of the works and to develop critical thinking skills. Students review and study major grammatical structures, read extensively, and develop increasing accuracy in written and oral expression through discussion of authentic literary texts and essay writing. Students work in groups and individually on topics of their choosing, learn to research in French and present on their findings, and engage in analytic and creative writing, as well as extensive discussions and debates of the course materials. The class is conducted exclusively in French.

Honors French Seminar: Cross-Cultural Communication in the World!

Team-based projects on major challenges of the contemporary world will develop information skills with reasoned inquiry and affective qualities applicable when analyzing personal, professional and societal issues. Encouraging increasingly complex thinking, independent learning, and collaboration skills, this course develops key critical skills through relevant global and cultural themes while promoting personal reflection and involvement of the students in their learning. Engaging opportunities for experiential learning and discussion points will investigate how misunderstandings and conflicts are created and can be resolved. The students will develop and demonstrate knowledge of cultures and worldviews, as well as identify social, economic, political, and environmental relationships between cultures and worldviews. They will use multiple lenses such as race and ethnicity, gender, social class, science and technology, regional culture, history and religion to understand one’s culture and articulate how the social construction of culture and worldviews shapes contemporary social and political issues. Students will critically read and analyze authentic materials such as articles and videos, while grammar in context reinforces grammatical knowledge pre-acquired by students. This course is designed for students to also enjoy using the French language while raising their intercultural understanding competencies.

Spanish

Spanish I

In level one the oral, writing, reading, and cultural aspects of beginning Spanish are fundamental. Students are encouraged to engage in spontaneous and practical conversation using the present and near future tenses. At the same time, they learn to write simple, grammatically accurate phrases in an environment stressing cooperation, creativity, and familiarity with the culture. Students hear and employ a gradually increasing amount of Spanish in class. We incorporate the textbook Vistas I, as well as tapes, videos, games, and slides, and guest speakers are incorporated into the main curriculum.

Spanish II

This course is designed to refine further students’ listening, speaking, writing, and study skills in a communicative classroom. Students will master and expand upon foundational skills by focusing on more detailed accuracy in their language acquisition, as well as decreasing their dependence on English thought and speech patterns. Increased emphasis will be placed on oral production and the ability to communicate in real-world situations on a vast range of topics. Class will be held primarily in Spanish.

Spanish III

This course builds upon knowledge gained in Spanish I and Spanish II and emphasizes developing confidence in speaking through intensive conversation practice. Students will use Spanish as the principal means of communication during class. In addition to oral conversations, dialogues and oral presentations, students will be asked to write short compositions and present research on a variety of cultural topics. Students will be expected to expand their vocabulary range to include more sophisticated terms, use advanced idiomatic expressions, and manipulate multiple verb tenses including the pluperfect and the subjunctive mood. A variety of methodologies will be used, including the use of technology and multimedia, as well as incorporating authentic materials.

Spanish IV

This course reviews complex grammatical structures, the acquisition of specialized vocabulary and idiomatic expressions, and the development of a sound oral and written abilities in all three modes of communication: interpretive, interpersonal, and presentational. This course is theme-based. In close relationship with those themes, many different kinds of texts will be studied, analyzed and interpreted on each unit, from informal writing/oral texts, to newspaper articles, music, commercials, literature, and film. Students will verbally engage in class discussions and debates—always in the target language— and will frequently write analytical responses, research papers and personal reflections about the topics presented in class. Descriptive, persuasive, expository, and narrative compositions will frequently be part of homework, and a peer review system will be in place to ensure a high-quality production of texts in the target language. Classes are held fully in Spanish.

Honors Spanish Seminar

Spanish Honors Seminar is a course that aims to move students into the advanced level of proficiency. We offer a 4-year rotating thematic approach, encompassing film & literature, history & politics, identity, aesthetics, social justice, women authors, and global challenges. Our students will have choices on how to show progression toward proficiency in their interpretive, presentational and interpersonal work and they will be given the choice to work in an interdisciplinary manner so they can bring into the curriculum what they are learning in other classes as well as bringing in their own passions. We want our students to reach beyond the classroom. Spanish Honors Seminars aims to give our students the opportunity to interact with people from different cultural backgrounds using authentic language appropriately. Through meaningful and pragmatic learning goals, a thematic approach and a curated collection of authentic texts, we hope to inspire our students to remain open-minded, interested, and curious about diverse cultural perspectives, products and practices.

Mandarin Chinese

Chinese I

Chinese I is designed to introduce Mandarin Chinese to students who have no or very little background in the language. It is a basic introduction to Chinese language and culture. Students start to learn Chinese phonetic system (pin yin) and Chinese characters. It introduces basic vocabulary and basic linguistic skills including introduction, greetings, directions, who and how questions, time, locations, dates and numbers, what questions, and expressions.

Chinese II

Chinese II continues to develop the language skills learned in Chinese I. Students should be able to explain cause and effect, compare and contrast ideas and objects, and participate in simple discussions on a wide variety of topics including personal care and entertainment, clothes shopping, sports and recreation, and telephone queries.

Chinese III

Chinese III begins with a review of grammatical concepts and usage learned in Chinese II. The class will continue to learn grammar that will enable them to express their opinions, intentions, desires, and personal interests. They will learn about gifts and holidays, weather, travel, dining and meals. Chinese will be the official language of the classroom.

Chinese IV

Chinese IV reviews the grammatical concepts and structures learned in Chinese III and use those concepts as the building blocks for new and more complex constructions. Students continue to study characters and to develop more sophisticated reading and writing skills. Students read short stories and articles in Chinese adapted from authentic materials. Students practice conversational skills in a broad range of topics.

Honors Chinese Seminar

Chinese Honors Seminar is a course that aims to move students into the advanced level of proficiency. In 2019-2020 we will explore the theme of Chinese Philosophy & Social Value through 5 interconnected units: family relationship, contemporary life, gender equity, social media and politics. Our students will have choices on how to show progression toward proficiency in their interpretive, presentational and interpersonal work and they will be given the choice to work in an interdisciplinary manner so they can bring into the curriculum what they are learning in other classes as well as bringing in their own passions. We want our students to reach beyond the classroom. Chinese Honors Seminar aims to give our students the opportunity to interact with people from different cultural backgrounds using authentic language appropriately. Through meaningful and pragmatic learning goals, a thematic approach and a curated collection of authentic texts, we hope to inspire our students to remain open-minded, interested, and curious about diverse cultural perspectives, products and practices. This course can be taken more than once for credit.

GOA

Please note: GOA World Language classes do not fulfill our three-year language requirement.

Arabic Language through Culture I

Through study of Levantine (Jordanian) Arabic and the Arabic writing system, students develop Novice proficiency in interpersonal communication. Students will be able to communicate in spontaneous spoken conversations on very familiar and everyday topics, including personal introductions, families, daily routines, and preferences, using a variety of practiced or memorized words, phrases, simple sentences, and questions. (Full year course)

Arabic Language through Culture II

Arabic II students have one year of Arabic Language Through Culture or have demonstrated Novice proficiency through summer coursework or other experiences. Students will communicate in spontaneous spoken conversations on familiar topics, including food, weather, and hobbies, using a variety of practiced or memorized words, phrases, simple sentences, and questions. (Full year course)

Arabic Language through Culture III

Students in Arabic III have demonstrated Intermediate interpersonal proficiency in Arabic (MSA or a dialect) through two years in Arabic Language Through Culture or other coursework, and have demonstrated an ability to work online independently and reliably with instructors and peers in Arabic Language Through Culture or another GOA class. Students in Arabic III will have opportunities to direct their own study through choice of material and topic. They will use Arabic to interact with native speakers on topics of their choosing, and to explore topics of interest through a variety of media (written works, audio, video, face-to-face interviews). (Full year course)

Chinese Language through Culture I

Through this introduction to Mandarin Chinese language and culture students will learn the building blocks of spoken and written communication- pronunciation, tones, stroke order and radical recognition. Students will carry out basic interactions in Chinese orally and in writing. Interpersonal communication and functional vocabulary acquisition will lay the foundations for a more in-depth study of Chinese writing and grammar. Vocabulary is practiced in a thematic and communicative way and will leave students prepared to exchange introductory greetings, as well as to discuss family, dates and time, hobbies, visiting friends, making plans among other topics. Students will also study cultural and historic elements of the Chinese-speaking world. Audio and video materials, computer software, games, projects, and presentations foster student interaction and participation. By the end of the first year, students will have achieved Novice level proficiency. (Full year course)

Japanese Language through Culture I

This full-year course is a unique combination of Japanese culture and language, weaving cultural comparison with the study of basic Japanese language and grammar. While examining various cultural topics such as literature, art, lifestyle and economy, students learn the basics of the Japanese writing system (Hiragana and Katakana), grammar and vocabulary. Through varied synchronous and asynchronous assignments, including hands-on projects and face-to-face communications, students develop their speaking, listening, reading and writing skills. The cultural study and discussions are conducted in English, with topics alternating every two to three weeks. The ultimate goal of this course is to raise awareness and appreciation of different cultures through learning the basics of the Japanese language. The focus of this course is 60 percent on language and 40 percent on culture. This course is appropriate for beginner-level students. (Full year course)

Japanese Language through Culture II

Through language learning, students in this course share their voices, cultivate global perspectives, and foster appreciation of self and others. Students expand their knowledge of the basic skills introduced in Japanese Language Through Culture I while further developing their speaking, listening, writing, and reading skills. Each unit follows the IPA model (Integrated Performance Assessment), blending three modes of communication: interpretation of authentic material in Japanese, synchronous and asynchronous practice in speaking and writing, and oral and written presentations. Each unit focuses on one of the following cultural topics: Design and Expression, Ecology, Entertainment, East meets West, Harmony, and Nature. In addition, students will have the opportunity to select and pursue topics of their own interest. Grammar topics will cover the essential forms that are typically introduced in the second and third year of a high school Japanese program. By learning the Dictionary Form, Nominalizer, TE form, TA form, NAI form, and Noun Modifier, students are able to add more complexity to their sentence construction. In doing so, they shift from forming simple sentences to communicating in a coherent paragraph. As online learners, students are expected to exhibit superb time management and communication skills, as well as to take ownership of their learning. While grammar instruction will be delivered through asynchronous work and face-to-face meetings, much of the course content will be curated and created by students through their research and collaboration. The focus of this course is 60 percent on language and 40 percent on culture. Prerequisite: Japanese Language through Culture I or permission from the instructor. (Full year course)

Japanese Language through Culture III

Students in Japanese III have mastered most of the conjugation patterns (TE/TA form, dictionary form, and NAI form) that are necessary to speak and write in complex structures. While advancing their grammatical knowledge (including giving and receiving, potential form, and honorific form), students will compare and examine similar functions and their subtle differences. In speaking, students are allowed to speak in informal/casual style with each other and with the teacher in order to solidify their control of the Plain Form. Interpersonal communications will be done through face-to-face conversation and recorded messages. In reading and listening, students will curate, share, and practice with grasping the gist of authentic materials. Such material may include TV commercials, news, movies, children’s books, online newspapers, and cooking recipes. In writing, students will work on creative writing, expository writing, and analytical writing (compare-and-contrast in the AP format). Semester 1 will incorporate JLPT N5 exam material. Taking the exam is not necessary but encouraged. In Semester 2, students will participate in the GOA Catalyst Conference. (Full year course)