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Molalla Rafting Trip

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Molalla River Rafting and Hiking Adventure

Middle Schoolers from Catlin went on a full out adventure the weekend of April 9 and 10, 2005. The group drove to near the headwaters of the Molalla River and set up camp. The weather was fair the first day. That afternoon the team headed up the hill to attempt the hike in to Table Rock. Snow covered the trail within the first half mile, so the going was pretty tough. The high point was reached by about 3pm, and the group took a rest and ate frosted pop tarts.

It was a bit chilly at the trailhead
A rest stop
Enjoying the wilderness experience
Bob Sauer led the way through the snow
Frosting the Pop Tarts

Making Snow Angels

Thde group camped next to the Molalla River that night. Despite about an hours effort at gathering firewood, the wet conditions made it difficult to get the roaring blaze they wanted! Hamburgers, garden burgers, baked beans and salad were on the menu for dinner.

Gathering wood for a fire
What a great hamburger - cooked by Helene and Abby!

The next day everyone boarded the rafts and floated down the Molalla River. Rapids up to Class 3 were no match for the team, including Papa Bear, Mama Bear, Baby Bear, Goldilocks, and Porridge Bowl. Almost all the students were tossed (or slipped) out of the boats at one time or another, but everyone was laughing and screaming the whole way down.

Getting geared up
Which way do we paddle?
The boat Captain
The river gets narrow
Explain this one, Mr. Geology

Skipper, were going under!
Warm and dry in the bus

_unformed_

Deschutes Rafting Trip

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Deschutes River Rafting Trip April 24-26, 2005

Deschutes Trip Report

See photos below

Our adventurous Deschutes river rafting trip began Sunday April 24 at 8 am when we met at Catlin to head off on a bus to Warm Springs where we put in. The group immediately bonded as we spread out on the bus, and prepared for the two hour drive. Once we arrived in Warm Springs our guide, Seth, was waiting, ready with the rafts, equipment, and a stack of dry bags. Everyone crammed all the worldly possessions they would need for the next three days into a bag. We split (by birth date) into raft groups, were briefed on how not tolose our lives during the treacherous trip, and embarked on our voyage. We paddled downstream in cold overcast weather for a few hours through easy class I and II rapids, where people still managed to fall off the rafts, until we reached “Whisky Dick” where we would spend the night. After a short walk on the train tracks where we accidentally dropped pennies and pesos on the track to be squished by passing trains, we ate a filling dinner of Top Ramen and Tortillas, then settled down to sleep. As expected it started to rain at about two in the morning, but dried out again by morning. Our sumptuous feast of Cocoa and Oatmeal started the day, even after a mishap with cocoa boiling over and dousing a stove. We cleaned the stove, took the tents down, packed our bags, and loaded the boats, then headed off downstream. To start the day we had a class IV rapid named Whitehorse. We stopped to scout the upper part of the rapid, and easily got through without any mishaps. The sun came out about midday and swimming became a popular activity along with go fish and balancing on the tube of the boat while everyone else spins the raft trying to knock you off. Once we arrived at Buckskin Mary where we were to spend the night, a crazy group of adventurous youth decided to swim the rapid. Off they went and as we watched they thoroughly soaked themselves in the large waves, and somehow managed to have a really good time. Late that afternoon we set up a slack line (tight rope walking) and Ian Wayne remembered that it was his birthday so Olivia kindly made him two cherry cheese cakes. Still later in the afternoon we did some group bonding activities which included a trust fall, getting everyone in the group through a spiders web of nylon webbing between two trees, and creating an obstacle course using paddles. After a delicious feast again with a Mexican flair we left the camp to examine a cave and walk through a railroad tunnel to town (Dant) where you could take the small boat ferry across and walk downstream to our camp. The cave was a slight disappointment but upon returning to our side of the river a group left on a short evening walk to the cliffs above camp. The group discussed how we all preferred this to school, then headed back to camp. After cleaning up dinner we had some scrumptious cherry cheese cake and Ian did an admirable job blowing out the candles. Seeing as the weather had vastly improved many decided to sleep out in the open. I personally have not slept that well in months, most likely due to the hourly visits of trains with their super cool lights and screeching wheels, ten hours of sleep, and being exceptionally content with where I was. In the morning we finished off the cherry cheese cake with some more oatmeal and broke camp for the last time. With new raft groups we had to figure out how to maneuver due to some slightly more exciting rapids during the day. First we hit up Box Car after stopping to scout it. Then later we passed through Maupin and headed down towards what I consider the most exciting rapid of the whole trip, Oak Springs, about ¾ of a mile short of the take out. You drop about 7 feet through a 20 foot wide gap, into a big really wet wave, and if you’re really lucky you can get stuck on the rocks directly down stream and spend about 5 minutes trying to get off. We concluded our trip among some very cool rock formations, and then took out at Sandy Beach. The bus arrived shortly and we helped Seth clean and store the rafts, organize the gear, and load his van. We changed clothes, boarded the bus, and sadly headed back to Catlin with wicked sunburns, content minds, and dread of the homework that awaited.

"Dude, have you ever tried to light a match on your braces?"
"We definitely did not bring enough Spam"

Opal Creek Breakaway trip

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Opal Creek is one of Oregons great treasures. This pristine watershed includes old growth forests, rugged terrain and crystal clear water. Students from Catlin Gabel spent three days hiking, swimming and camping along the shores of Opal Creek. Staff from the nearby Opal Creek Education Center spent a morning with the group dicussing the ecology of old growth forests.

Goat Rocks Backpack Trip

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Two teams of 8th, 9th and 10th graders set out to explore the Goat rocks Wilderness in mid June. It was showering when we packed up for the hike, which was definitely annoying. The hiking temperature was nice, though. The packs were inexplicably heavy. The first group set up camp at maybe 5750 feet in the meadows that are part of snowgrass flats. Our group went up to where the 96 trail meets the trail to Goat Lake and camped in a beautiful campsite at 6000 feet. It was clear of snow, the snowline was just at 6000 feet.

On the second day our group traveled mostly cross country and did a physically challenging ascent of Old Snowy: the first peak to be climbed by the new Catlin Gabel Outdoor Program. The weather was glorious on this day. The other group made the long trek to Cispus Pass, mostly over snow. They made an attempt to rendezvous with us at our camp on their return, but the snow obscured the trail and they lost their way. I think this was a challenging and rewarding day for both groups.

On the third day we awoke to cloudy skies, but the rain did not come. We packed up and hiked out, eventually meeting the other group at the main bridge over Snowgrass Creek. We drove the 3-4 hours back to Catlin Gabel and bid good bye to the group there.

Deschutes Rafting Trip April 24-26, 2005

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Deschutes Trip Report

See photos below

Our adventurous Deschutes river rafting trip began Sunday April 24 at 8 am when we met at Catlin to head off on a bus to Warm Springs where we put in. The group immediately bonded as we spread out on the bus, and prepared for the two hour drive. Once we arrived in Warm Springs our guide, Seth, was waiting, ready with the rafts, equipment, and a stack of dry bags. Everyone crammed all the worldly possessions they would need for the next three days into a bag. We split (by birth date) into raft groups, were briefed on how not tolose our lives during the treacherous trip, and embarked on our voyage. We paddled downstream in cold overcast weather for a few hours through easy class I and II rapids, where people still managed to fall off the rafts, until we reached “Whisky Dick” where we would spend the night. After a short walk on the train tracks where we accidentally dropped pennies and pesos on the track to be squished by passing trains, we ate a filling dinner of Top Ramen and Tortillas, then settled down to sleep. As expected it started to rain at about two in the morning, but dried out again by morning. Our sumptuous feast of Cocoa and Oatmeal started the day, even after a mishap with cocoa boiling over and dousing a stove. We cleaned the stove, took the tents down, packed our bags, and loaded the boats, then headed off downstream. To start the day we had a class IV rapid named Whitehorse. We stopped to scout the upper part of the rapid, and easily got through without any mishaps. The sun came out about midday and swimming became a popular activity along with go fish and balancing on the tube of the boat while everyone else spins the raft trying to knock you off. Once we arrived at Buckskin Mary where we were to spend the night, a crazy group of adventurous youth decided to swim the rapid. Off they went and as we watched they thoroughly soaked themselves in the large waves, and somehow managed to have a really good time. Late that afternoon we set up a slack line (tight rope walking) and Ian Wayne remembered that it was his birthday so Olivia kindly made him two cherry cheese cakes. Still later in the afternoon we did some group bonding activities which included a trust fall, getting everyone in the group through a spiders web of nylon webbing between two trees, and creating an obstacle course using paddles. After a delicious feast again with a Mexican flair we left the camp to examine a cave and walk through a railroad tunnel to town (Dant) where you could take the small boat ferry across and walk downstream to our camp. The cave was a slight disappointment but upon returning to our side of the river a group left on a short evening walk to the cliffs above camp. The group discussed how we all preferred this to school, then headed back to camp. After cleaning up dinner we had some scrumptious cherry cheese cake and Ian did an admirable job blowing out the candles. Seeing as the weather had vastly improved many decided to sleep out in the open. I personally have not slept that well in months, most likely due to the hourly visits of trains with their super cool lights and screeching wheels, ten hours of sleep, and being exceptionally content with where I was. In the morning we finished off the cherry cheese cake with some more oatmeal and broke camp for the last time. With new raft groups we had to figure out how to maneuver due to some slightly more exciting rapids during the day. First we hit up Box Car after stopping to scout it. Then later we passed through Maupin and headed down towards what I consider the most exciting rapid of the whole trip, Oak Springs, about ¾ of a mile short of the take out. You drop about 7 feet through a 20 foot wide gap, into a big really wet wave, and if you’re really lucky you can get stuck on the rocks directly down stream and spend about 5 minutes trying to get off. We concluded our trip among some very cool rock formations, and then took out at Sandy Beach. The bus arrived shortly and we helped Seth clean and store the rafts, organize the gear, and load his van. We changed clothes, boarded the bus, and sadly headed back to Catlin with wicked sunburns, content minds, and dread of the homework that awaited.

"Dude, have you ever tried to light a match on your braces?"
"We definitely did not bring enough Spam"

Molalla River Rafting and Hiking Adventure

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Trip Photos and Reports

Molalla River Rafting and Hiking Adventure

Middle Schoolers from Catlin went on a full out adventure the weekend of April 9 and 10, 2005. The group drove to near the headwaters of the Molalla River and set up camp. The weather was fair the first day. That afternoon the team headed up the hill to attempt the hike in to Table Rock. Snow covered the trail within the first half mile, so the going was pretty tough. The high point was reached by about 3pm, and the group took a rest and ate frosted pop tarts.

It was a bit chilly at the trailhead
A rest stop
Enjoying the wilderness experience
Bob Sauer led the way through the snow
Frosting the Pop Tarts

Making Snow Angels

Thde group camped next to the Molalla River that night. Despite about an hours effort at gathering firewood, the wet conditions made it difficult to get the roaring blaze they wanted! Hamburgers, garden burgers, baked beans and salad were on the menu for dinner.

Gathering wood for a fire
What a great hamburger - cooked by Helene and Abby!

The next day everyone boarded the rafts and floated down the Molalla River. Rapids up to Class 3 were no match for the team, including Papa Bear, Mama Bear, Baby Bear, Goldilocks, and Porridge Bowl. Almost all the students were tossed (or slipped) out of the boats at one time or another, but everyone was laughing and screaming the whole way down.

Getting geared up
Which way do we paddle?
The boat Captain
The river gets narrow
Explain this one, Mr. Geology

Skipper, were going under!
Warm and dry in the bus

_unformed_

Rooster Rock Climb

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Upper School Climbs Rooster Rock

A bold party of Catlin Gabel Upper Schoolers set out on April 11th to ascend one of Oregons landmark pinnacles: Rooster Rock in the Columbia Gorge. After discussing the history and naming of the prominent landmark, the party of six made the hazardous approach to its objective.

Early painting of Rooster Rock. The route takes the dihedral in the center, moving up and right.
Approach Hike through the stinging nettles
Oooh Ben, do you think shorts are best idea?

The climb of the spire itself involved two pitches of moderate rock climbing, up to 5.3. The rock is good in quality, since all the bad rock had been knocked off by earlier parties.

The team of six roped up at the base of the pillar. Olivia Miller led the first pitch to the two bolt anchor. The other five followed. It was a cramped belay ledge for six, but Olivia was soon on her way again, leading the second pitch.

At the first belay station
The mossy beginning to the first pitch
On the first pitch
Belaying at the small belay ledge half way up the rock
High above the trees: Sarah Wolf
The views of the Columbia River are tremendous
What, theres more to go?

The second pitch of Rooster Rock features fine climbing on easily protected rock. The exposure is a bit frightening, but the Catlin team made short work of it.

Topping out! Interstate 84 in the distance
On top of Rooster Rock, April 11, 2005

Oregon Desert Winterim 2005

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Oregon Desert Adventure: February 2005

Rock climbing, caving and exploring ghost towns highlighted the winterim trip for Catlin students during their 2005 Winterim.

 

Oregon Desert Winterim 2005

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Oregon Desert Adventure: February 2005

Rock climbing, caving and exploring ghost towns highlighted the winterim trip for Catlin students during their 2005 Winterim.

 

Spencer Ehrman '35: 2004 Distinguished Alumni Award recipient

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Gabel School alumnus Spencer Ehrman '35 died peacefully in April 2004 after a short illness. Spencer had a long and important relationship with Catlin Gabel. We are pleased that he learned of his Distinguished Alumni Award before his death.

When Spencer Ehrman became chair of the Gabel Country Day School’s board, he didn’t imagine that he would soon preside over its merger with the Catlin-Hillside School to become Catlin Gabel.

In February 1957, as chair of the Gabel Country Day School’s board, Spencer delivered a persuasive speech to Gabel parents about the proposed merger with Catlin. Both schools were in dire financial straits, and he had headed the committee charged with exploring a unification of the two. The governance structures of the schools differed— while Catlin’s board would make the decision, all Gabel parents had a vote. His key points covered the schools’ similar cultures and traditions, prospective economies of scale, impending property issues, and fundraising challenges in the Portland community. Facing a rebellion among parents (some were outraged that merger news had first come in the paper, and upset about how the administrative positions would be allocated among the schools’ current staff), he meticulously countered every objection, and the merger won by a single vote.

The School is a four-generation family tradition for Spencer. His father graduated from Gabel’s predecessor, the Portland Academy, in 1907. He started at Gabel in 1926, eventually skipping three grades and becoming its first high school graduate in 1935. Too young to go to college, Spencer spent a year at Lincoln High School in Portland, and a year at Andover Academy in Massachusetts before attending Yale University, thus graduating from three different high schools. Spencer’s sister, Alayne, graduated in 1940 from Miss Catlin’s School. His children, Spencer, Jr. ’68, Debbie ’73, and Susan ’75 were “lifers” at Catlin Gabel. Two of his grandchildren, Mason Kaye ’04 and Rob Kaye ’07 are current students.

Spencer’s first wife, the late Pat Ehrman, led many volunteer efforts at Catlin Gabel, chairing the Rummage Sale twice in the 1960s and serving on the board of trustees. The school’s annual citizenship award honoring seniors bears her name. For many years Spencer played a key role in the Rummage Sale, serving as its unofficial “financial advisor” and money-counter.

Beyond the profound mark he and his family have made on Catlin Gabel, Spencer Ehrman’s career included decades of community service and business expertise. From 1942 to 1946 he served in the U.S. Navy as a communications officer. Aboard the U.S.S. San Diego he became the first American ashore in Tokyo Bay at the end of World War II. He served as a principal in Mason, Ehrman & Company, and later Schuss Wholesale and S.E. Rykoff, all businesses involved in wholesale or institutional food distribution. He was known for his ability to solve complex problems and bring diverse philosophies together.

Throughout his long career he has continued to serve the community. As president of the Deschutes Club for 14 years, he brokered successful cooperation between the club, the Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs Indian Reservation, the Bureau of Land Management, the River Guides Association, local cattlemen, and the State of Oregon, preserving the lower Deschutes River for multiple conservation-based uses. He also served on the boards of numerous other local organizations where he contributed his hard work, winning personality, and sound judgment.

A lifelong Portlander, Spencer’s passions include reading, fly fishing, and bridge. Recently, he generously supported our School’s diversity program, serving on the board’s Diversity Committee and underwriting the 1999 Symposium on Race and Class.

As Karen Atiyeh (Gabel ’43) said in nominating Spencer for the Distinguished Alumni Award, “He has continued his commitment to the growth of Portland and the State of Oregon with dedication and enthusiasm in the fields of business, education, civic and cultural activities, and environmental leadership.” Spencer will be fondly remembered for his many contributions to the School, the city of Portland, and the state of Oregon.

Rooster Rock Climb

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Upper School Climbs Rooster Rock

A bold party of Catlin Gabel Upper Schoolers set out on April 11th to ascend one of Oregons landmark pinnacles: Rooster Rock in the Columbia Gorge. After discussing the history and naming of the prominent landmark, the party of six made the hazardous approach to its objective.

Early painting of Rooster Rock. The route takes the dihedral in the center, moving up and right.
Approach Hike through the stinging nettles
Oooh Ben, do you think shorts are best idea?

The climb of the spire itself involved two pitches of moderate rock climbing, up to 5.3. The rock is good in quality, since all the bad rock had been knocked off by earlier parties.

The team of six roped up at the base of the pillar. Olivia Miller led the first pitch to the two bolt anchor. The other five followed. It was a cramped belay ledge for six, but Olivia was soon on her way again, leading the second pitch.

At the first belay station
The mossy beginning to the first pitch
On the first pitch
Belaying at the small belay ledge half way up the rock
High above the trees: Sarah Wolf
The views of the Columbia River are tremendous
What, theres more to go?

The second pitch of Rooster Rock features fine climbing on easily protected rock. The exposure is a bit frightening, but the Catlin team made short work of it.

Topping out! Interstate 84 in the distance
On top of Rooster Rock, April 11, 2005

David Lawrence '58: 2003 Distinguished Alumni Award recipient

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Dr. Lawrence was named CEO of Kaiser Foundation Health Plan, Inc. and Kaiser Foundation Hospitals in 1991 and Chairman of the Board in 1992. Prior to assuming his current role, Dr. Lawrence served KFHP/KFH as vice chairman and chief operating officer (1990-91); senior vice president and regional manager for Northern California (1988-89); vice president and regional manager in Colorado (1985-88). He also was vice president and area medical director for Northwest Permanente in Portland (1981-85). Dr. Lawrence also served as health officer and director of Human Services in Multnomah County, Oregon; on the faculty of Department of Health Services and Director of MEDEX in the School of Public Health and Community Medicine, University of Washington; as advisor to the Ministry of Health of Chile; and as Peace Corps Physician in the Dominican Republic and Washington, D.C.

Dr. Lawrence is a graduate of Amherst College (BA), the University of Kentucky (MD), and the University of Washington (MPH). He is Board Certified in General Preventive Medicine (Johns Hopkins and University of Washington). He is a member of Alpha Omega Alpha (Medical Honorary Society) and the Institute of Medicine (National Academy of Sciences). He currently serves on the Boards of Agilent Technologies, Pacific Gas and Electric Company, Raffles Medical Group of Singapore, The Rockefeller Foundation, RAND Health Advisory Board, the Bay Area Council, and the Hospital Research and Educational Trust (AHA). He previously served as chair of the International Federation of Health Funds and the University of California's President's Board on Research and Economic Development.

Dr. Lawrence is nationally known for his advocacy for improvements in the American health care delivery system. He served as member of the Institute of Medicine's Committee on Quality of Health Care in America that produced the landmark report on patient safety, "To Err is Human," and the blueprint for improving America's health care system, "The Quality Chasm."

Dr. Lawrence has been active in San Francisco Bay Area community affairs, serving as a member of the Board of Directors of the United Way of the Bay Area and chair of the annual campaign for the United Way in Alameda County and the San Francisco Bay Area. Dr. Lawrence has been recognized as the Outstanding Alumnus of the School of Public Health and Community Medicine, University of Washington (1980); and The Outstanding Alumnus of the College of Medicine, University of Kentucky (1995). He was inducted into the Hall of Distinguished Alumni of the University of Kentucky (1995); and has received honorary degrees from Amherst College (Doctor of Science, 1994), and Colgate University (Doctor of Letters, 1995).

Given Kaiser Permanente's vast influence on American medicine, Dr. Lawrence's successful stewardship of his organization constitutes a contribution not only to Kaiser Permanente's 8.4 million members nationwide, but to all Americans. He is to be commended for the positive impact that Kaiser Permanente has had on the quality and affordability of health care in the United States.

David Bragdon ’77: 2002 Distinguished Alumni Award recipient

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The Alumni Board awarded David Bragdon ’77 the Catlin Gabel Distinguished Alumni Award on June 15, 2002, during Alumni Weekend fesitivies.

David spent eight years in international marketing with Nike, Lasco Shipping, and Evergreen Airlines and five years as the marketing manager for the Port of Portland.

David was first elected to Portland’s Metro Council in 1998. Initially, he supplemented his modest income as a part-time Metro Councilor, by driving a taxi, which added to his long-standing interest in transportation issues in Portland. David has been twice chosen as the Council’s presiding officer. Currently, he is a candidate for the new position of Metro Council President.

(The Metro Council’s responsibilities include maintaining greater Portland’s Urban Growth Boundary, managing solid waste disposal for the 24-city area, developing public transportation policy, establishing wildlife protection plans, and managing the Oregon Zoo and the Convention Center.)

David has long been an activist for public policy that affects the quality of life in Portland. In eighth grade, he wrote the city’s first Bus Riders’ Guide. In a discussion of urban growth, David recently remarked, "Numbers don’t really tell you what it is like to live somewhere. There’s huge density in Paris. There’s low density in Houston. Which is a better place to live?"

The Oregonian columnist Jonathon Nicholas characterized David as "one of a handful of authentically bright stars on Oregon’s political horizon."

Barbara Farrow Walker ’53: 2001 Distinguished Alumni Award recipient

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Over the course of thirty years, Barbara Farrow Walker ’53 has transformed Portland’s livability. In addition to founding the 40 Mile Loop Land Trust for a system of trails encircling Portland, she was a leader in the creation of Tom McCall Waterfront Park, Pioneer Courthouse Square, and the Eastside Esplanade.

Roger Meier '43: 2000 Distinguished Alumni Award recipient

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In addition to his renown as an art connoisseur and community advocate, Roger Meier '43 is widely recognized as the architect of Oregon's Public Employees Retirement System. Under Roger's leadership, the system assets grew from $400 million to $7 billion in 14 years, generating a profound financial benefit for Oregonians.

Nancy Neighbor Russell ’49: 1999 Distinguished Alumni Award recipient

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Nancy Neighbor Russell ’49 drafted the legislation and secured bipartisan support for an unprecedented federal law creating the first national scenic area. She co-founded the Friends of the Columbia Gorge to ensure the dictates of this new law. Nancy died September 19, 2008.

Phyllis Cantrell Reynolds ’47: 1998 Distinguished Alumni Award recipient

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In addition to being a clinical psychologist, potter, printmaker, and photographer, Phyllis Cantrell Reynolds ’47 has been a tireless advocate for the importance of trees in urban areas, especially in Portland. She is on the Board of the Japanese Garden and has been actively involved in horticulture at the Portland Garden Club, Reed College, Catlin Gabel School, and Hoyt Arboretum. She co-wrote, with Elizabeth Fitzgibbon Dimon ’49, Trees of Greater Portland (Timber Press), a field guide of the best trees in the Portland area and where to view them.

Marian Wood Kolisch '37: 1997 Distinguished Alumni Award recipient

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Artist Marian Wood Kolish ’37, studied photography with Ansel Adams in the 1970s and has since developed a substantial portfolio of portraits of “cultural visionaries,” Oregonians who have had an impact on the history and cultural life of our state. Her work has been displayed at the Portland Art Museum and in the Governor’s ceremonial office.

Philip Hawley '43: 1996 Distinguished Alumni Award recipient

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Philip Hawley ’43 has shown nearly 40 years of consistent leadership in business, as well as civic, educational, and public activities at the local, regional, national, and international levels. Aside from being retired chairman of Carter Hawley Hale Stores, Inc., Mr. Hawley has served on several of the largest corporate boards in the country. He currently serves as trustee for California Institute of Technology, the University of Notre Dame, the Haynes Foundation, and the Huntington Library and Art Gallery.