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Middle Schoolers Eve Maquelin and Andrew Park take home gold from national Science Olympiad

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Congratulations!

Eve (grade 7) and Andrew (grade 6) beat 118 other students in the “Write It, Do It” category of the competition. Their gold-medal performance was judged on teamwork, abstract expression, logical thought, and clear, concise writing.

More than 800 students from 47 states in grades 6 through 9 competed in the middle school division of the National Science Olympiad, in Madison, Wisconsin.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Four tennis players advance to state finals

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Junior Andrew Salvador won the district boys singles championship, seniors Will Caplan and Reid Goodman took the boys doubles title, and junior Kate Rubinstein finished as district runner up in girls singles. They will compete for state titles on May 20 and 21 in Eugene.

Boys and girls golf teams head to state

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Congratulations, Eagles!

The boys team will compete at the state for the ninth consecutive time after winning their district title by 21 shots. The girls are going to state for the first time after finishing in second place at district. The state competition for boys and girls is on May 16 and 17 at Trysting Tree Golf Club in Corvallis. Congratulations, Eagles!
 

 

 

Students read their work at Powell's Books

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Sunday, May 22, 4 p.m.

The editors of Honoring Our Rivers Anthology of Student Artwork and Literature selected the work of three 5th graders and 29 6th graders for inclusion in this year’s collection. Students from across the state who are in the anthology are invited to present their work at Powell's on Sunday, May 22, at 4 p.m.

Students in kindergarten through college were eligible to submit their literature and artwork. Submissions focused on the relationship between people and the Willamette Watershed--the waters, weather, land, plants, animals, and habitats that make up this beautiful and fragile river system.

Congratulations to 5th graders Olivia Andersen, Macey Ferron-Jones, and Anaga Srinivas, and 6th graders Mo Alan, Carly Allen, Robin Attey, Hannah Cassin, Gracie Cavenaugh, Shinto Davis, Gus Edelen O'Brien, Beatrice Endler, Athena Erickson, Miguel Gachupin, Sophie Glew, Jasper Gordon, Ian Bryce Hoyt, Safina Lewis, Colin Mitchell, Darya Mojab, Conner Nelson, Sahil Nerurkar, Mark Nicholson, Lila Reich, Holly Sauer, Ryan Selden, Emily Slusher, Quinn Smesrud, Aidan Smith, Kenzie Stuvland, Grace Wong, Liam Wynne, and Jackson Zechnich.

Senior Vighnesh Shiv is a semifinalist in the Google Science Fair. Cast your vote for the People’s Choice Award by May 20.

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More than 7,500 students from 90 countries entered the competition. Vighnesh is one of 20 semifinalists in his age group. A panel of judges will select five finalists in each age group to visit Google headquarters for final judging and the opportunity to win a generous college scholarship.

In addition, with your votes Vighnesh could win the People’s Choice Award.

Vote for Vighnesh now!

Japanese language students selected for Living Language Experience Program

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All the fourth and fifth year Japanese language students in Yoko Iwasaki’s classes were selected for the Living Language Experience (LLE) Program, which builds bridges between classrooms and the Japanese business world. The 19 students were accepted into the program based on their outstanding Japanese language proficiency — the largest group of qualifying students in Oregon. Students had to pass the Oregon Benchmark Level 4 exam to qualify.

Few outsiders are given the opportunity to visit U.S.-based Japanese companies and observe their inner workings. The students interacted in Japanese with native Japanese business professionals to arrange their visits, tour the facilities, and engage in conversation about the products or services.

Rohan Jhunjhunwala, Gene Yamamoto, and Cole Williamson visited JAE Oregon, Inc., a manufacturer of electrical connectors.

Lizzie Medford, Danielle Shapira, Megan Stater, and Ramtin Rahmani visited Pacific Nutritional Foods Inc., a tofu processing and packaging plant.

Jackson Morawski, Anthony Eden, Will Jolley, and Koichi Omara visited Tokyo Ohka Kogyo America, Inc., manufacturers of photoresists and auxiliary chemicals.

Jesse Kimsey-Bennett, Cameron Boyd, Emrys Dennison, and Lauren Spiegel visited Pasco Corporation of America, a bakery, deli, and food service products manufacturer.

Alex Foster, Sabin Ray, Qiddist Hammerly, and Andrew Hungate visited Nippon Express U.S.A. Inc., a division of Nippon Express Group, the world's largest full-service freight forwarder.

Members of Shokookai, a Japanese business alliance in Portland, are interested in how the LLE program works at the high school level (colleges participate, too), and are eager to know what effect the experience has on students. To that end, Yoshio Oda from Epson Portland, Inc., and a board member of Shokookai, and Miwa Pierce, a Shokookai staff member, came to Catlin Gabel to attend student presentations about their visits to Japanese businesses. Yoko will speak at an upcoming Shokookai meeting.
 

Siemens We Can Change the World Challenge names Catlin Gabel team state winners

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The Siemens competition challenges students to create sustainable, reproducible, energy-related environmental improvements that can be replicated around the globe. Catlin Gabel’s Team Turbine, advised by Veronica Ledoux and composed of sophomores Marina Dimitrov and Mark Van Bergen, and senior Sarah Ellis, were winners for the state of Oregon. They had realized that the water arriving at Catlin Gabel travels downhill and thus arrives at the school under higher pressure than necessary. They determined that installing a microturbine in the school’s water line could harvest usable energy from this pressure difference. Sophomore Cody Hoyt produced this video that explains the possibilities of the project, and posted it on YouTube to share with others around the world. The team plans to present at the Oregon School Facilities Management Association annual conference and hopes to use the school’s international connections to expand the project further. National winners will be announced in mid-May.

 

CGS community saddened by the loss of Harold Schnitzer

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The Catlin Gabel community mourns the loss of Harold Schnitzer, a Catlin Gabel parent and grandparent and one of the state's foremost philanthropists. He died on April 27, 2011.

Head of school Lark Palma said, "Harold was a devoted father and grandfather who rejoiced in watching his granddaughters perform at school events. All of Portland as well as this school benefited from his generosity and kind spirit. The Beginning School was built in part by his generosity, and most lately he supported our planned creative arts center, where the Middle School drama classroom will bear his name. His support of the school's CommuniCare program enabled students to form their own philanthropic organization, investigate need in the community, and be a part of the effort to improve the lives of citizens in the Portland community. We will miss his gentle presence."

For more on Harold Schnitzer's life and a video of his son Jordan Schnitzer '69 giving a heartful tribute to this wonderful man, see this KOIN-TV report.

Gambol auction in Oregonian

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Oregonian article, April '11

Alumnus Ian McCluskey's short film recommended by Wall Street Journal

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Ian McCluskey '91's film Summer Snapshot is one of eight shorts the Wall Street Journal recommends viewers see at the Tribeca Film Festival. The WSJ calls the film an "Instagram-esque look at the summer day you wish you had had growing up. Nostalgic, wistful, perfect." Ian's film was selected for the festival, along with 60 others, from a pool of 2,800 submissions.

Eighth graders praised for their published poetry

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Experiential learning in the core curriculum

Eighth grade students in Glenn Etter's English class wrote poetry that connects to the missions of local businesses and organizations. Each student sent three poems to an organization and asked to have their poems displayed on a wall, thereby making the students “published” poets.

The response has been extraordinary! Two students are poets of the week at Powell’s Books. (Last week’s poets were W.B. Yeats and e.e. cummings!) Another student’s poem was forwarded and posted at flower shops in Paris and London. Several businesses have asked permission to frame and permanently display the poems.

Some replies

Hi Glenn,

I run the poetry section here at Powells, Cedar Hills. Recently, I received poems submitted by two of your students, Sarah Norris and Emma Marcus. I thought they were both terrific and well worth sharing with our customers.

I have posted them on the wall by the poetry section for people to enjoy. Each Monday, I also print up several copies of a "poem of the week" that customers are encouraged to take with them. I have printed copies of Sarah and Emma's poems to feature as our poems for this week. Most recently, we've featured W. B. Yeats and e.e. cummings, so they can be assured of being in good company.

Thank you for forwarding them to us.

Sincerely,
John Cabral
Powells, Cedar Hills Crossing


Dear Glenn,
My name is Frank Blanchard and I am a designer and Director of Business Development and Event Design here in Portland at Flowers Tommy Luke.
One of your students, Lauren Fogelstrom, sent us a poem she had written and I must say it couldn’t have come at a better time. Just wanted to let you know that we have not only shared it with Portland, but Lauren has officially gone “Global”. I posted her poem entitled “Daffodil” today on our Flowers Tommy Luke facebook page, my personal facebook page, and several of my floral industry friends pages in Boston, Georgia, Florida, California, and New York City as well as London and Paris. I think it was a bright spot a lot of us could use about now.
 

Thank You Lauren!
 

Sincerely,
Frank Blanchard, Director
Business Development/Event Design
Flowers Tommy Luke


Hello Mr. Etter. I am the manager of Everyday Music. I am writing to let you know we have received the poems by your students, and have proudly displayed them in our windows facing Burnside Street. Please let the students know that we thoroughly enjoyed reading them, and are so excited to have them up. So far, the staff favorite seems to be Johns! Thank you so much for thinking of us and sending them our way. If the kids ever want to come in and introduce themselves I will be happy to give them 10 percent off anything they purchase. Thanks again!

Auggie Rebelo
Store Manager
Everyday Music


Hello Mr. Etter/Glenn/Teacher!

Our optometry clinic received two poems today from Jillian Rix & Maddy Prunnenberg-Ross and we thought they were very well written. Our office specializes in primary care optometry catering to patents of all ages. These poems would be a perfect fit for our office and we were wondering if it would be possible to have both Jillian & Maddy hand wright the poems so that we can have them framed and displayed in our office for the public to enjoy? A 4X6 or 5X7 piece of paper would be perfect.
Please let me know when you have a chance. Thank you and have a great weekend!

Rob Phillips


Dear Mr. Etter,

Today we received a cover letter and a most wonderful and sensitive poem
from your student, Dylan Gaus. I will proudly display it in my flower shop studio and discuss it with
clients who come into the store. What a valuable experience you present to your students by encouraging them to share their art with the community. As a business owner and community activist, I am delighted to see creativity both supported and displayed as part of the learning process.

Thank you both.

Most sincerely,
Pat Hutchins and Mary Anne Huseby
Flowers In Flight
308 SW 1st Avenue
Portland, Oregon 97204


Greetings Glenn Etter,

I am the Sections Manager for the Blue Room (which contains our main Poetry sections) and I received a couple of poems and letters from two of your 8th Grade students. I was very pleased to see that you have created such a great class project around National Poetry month and that your students thought of us here at Powell's to share them with!
We have posted the poems of Garet Neal and Ashley Tam in a display case in the Pearl Room Gallery where we are also showcasing some of our customer's favorite lines of poetry this month.

Kudos to yourself and your team and good luck in the competition!

Sincerely yours in the appreciation of books, reading, and poetry,

Liz Vogan
Sections Manager, Literature and Humanities
Powell's City of Books
503-228-4651 x 1333


 

Hello, I will be posting the poem of Hanna Sheikh in our golf shop and I went one step past that. Her poem is also published on our website. You can find it here
http://claremontgolfclub.com/sites/courses/supersite.asp?id=908&page=63035

Please let me know if she prefers to have it removed from the site.
Thank you,
Kathy Wentworth
Claremont Golf Club
Golf Shop Manager
503-690-4589


Hello Catlin Gabel,

I received a poem from Raina Morris about "My Grandmother". I am the activity director at Beaverton Hills, I read the poem to my residents they all enjoyed it and we post it up in our community. Will you please tell Raina thank you for sharing her loving poem.
 

May Huff
Activity Director
Beaverton Hills


Dear Mr. Etter;

We have posted the poems that we received from the following students: Lauren Fogelstrom, Dylan Gaus, Sarah Norris, Kallan Dana, Mary Gilleland and Nikki Nelson. I admire their work, there is some real imagination and creativity there. I think they are fortunate to be learning from you.

Sincerely,

Bill Gifford
Gifford’s Flowers
704 S.W. Jefferson
Portland, Oregon 97201


Dear Mr. Glenn Etter-

I am writing to inform you that we have put on the wall 2 poems sent to us by students in your 8th grade class. Kallisti Kenaley-Lundberg and Max Armstrong can be proud "published" poets. I hope they get a chance to see their poems: If I Were A Watter Bottle and Snow on the wall at the store. They made us smile!

Thanks for thinking of us, Julie Watson, Next Adventure


Hello -
My name is Alta Fleming and I'm the manager for Ben & Jerry's on Hawthorne - just wanted you to know that I received Simon's poem and we've posted it on our wall. He did a great job!!

Thanks --
Alta Fleming
Ben & Jerry's
Hawthorne and Clackamas Town Center Stores


I liked very much the christmas poem by nicholas destephano.
we will post it somewhere in the shop.

best, ron rich
owner
oblation papers & press
516 northwest 12th avenue
portland, oregon 97209


Hello Mr. Etter,
We received a kind letter from your student, Maya Banitt, along with a very beautiful poem. At her request, I just wanted to let you know that we would be happy to post her poem in our offices. This poem is most appropriate for our business in designing fireplaces.

Please pass on our appreciation to her for sharing her work with us.

Warm regards,

Debbie

Debbie J. Webb, Office Manager
Moberg Fireplaces, Inc.
Cellar Building, Suite 300
1124 NW Couch St., Portland, OR 97209


Dear Glenn Etter,

We received the poem written by your student Jillian Rix today. We are posting it in the front area of our shop for customers to enjoy. Thank you for teaching, encouraging our youth and celebrating creativity!

Sincerely,

Lavonne Heacock, office manager
Ed Geesman, violin maker, owner
Geesman Fine Violins


Hi Mr. Etter,

I am Robyn Stumpf owner of Wild Iris Flowers & Gifts in Molalla Oregon.
I received a great poem from your student Daniel Chang and am writing to inform you we have posted it on our wall by our candy retail area! Title of the poem was fitting! CANDY

Thank You
Robyn Stumpf
Wild Iris flowers & Gifts
503-829-4747


Mr. Etter, I am writing on behalf of the Petco in Albany, OR. We received Aaron Shapira's poem, we thought it was wonderful and have it posted on our bulletin board out front and in the back room for our employees! Please pass on our admiration to Aaron, the poem is great! Thank you,
Keri Capen, Salon Manager Petco


Dear Mr. Etter,
I received a beautiful poem today from one of your students, Jarod. He did an excellent job writing it and I will hang it up in our store with pride. We are a seasonal farm store and will open up the end of August. Jarod's poem will be able to be viewed by all our customers this fall season. Please tell him thank you from all of us.

Kim
Oregon Heritage Farms


Dear Mr. Etter,

On Saturday April 16th, 2011, Tualatin Valley Fire and Rescue’s Station 65 received a letter and poem from a student of yours by the name of Jarod. As requested in his letter, the poem has been placed where all can read it and I just wanted to thank him and yourself for the poem. We will all enjoy the poem, “Jumping, Leaping”, and invite you and your class to come by the station sometime for a tour.
Recently, our station along with Station 60 located off Cornell Rd in Forest Heights, visited your facilities and had our own tour. Thank you again for including us as part of your community and thank you for the wonderful poetry project conducted by your students.

Respectfully,

Jerry Freeman II
Lt/Pm E-65 “C”
Tualatin Valley Fire & Rescue


Dear Maddy's teacher (Mr. Glenn Etter),

It was a pleasure to receive Maddy's sweet poem "Window". We posted it in our office and all our staff read it adn really enjoyed it. Thank you very much! Please say thank you to Maddy (we don't have her address or email).
Sincerely,

Dr. Friberg
--
Zuzana B. Friberg, O.D., F.A.A.O.
Uptown EyeCare & Optical, P.C.


Dear Glenn,
Your student Evan Chapman has his poem "crayon" on our wall at Gossamer.
Thank you, Rose Sabel-Dodge-owner of Gossamer

"The desire to create and craft is the antidote to alienation"
Be Creative & Crafty


I received Conner's poem today. What a wonderful poem. I put it up on the counter for all to see. You may tell Conner he is published.
thank you very much
Heather-Halloween warehouse


Hello Mr. Etter - My name is Kristi Erlich and I am the owner of Owls Nest North Therapy Collaboration. I received a letter and poem from your student, Hanna Sheikh, and am writing to acknowledge receipt of them. Please convey my sincerest thanks to Hanna for choosing our organization to be the lucky recipients of her poem and let her know that we are, indeed, most honored to post/publish it for our clients to be inspired by. Our clients come from all walks of life and are touched in many ways by the connections they make. Hanna's poem speaks to our intention to provide healing experiences through art and connection. Please thank her for sharing herself with our community.

Warmly,
Kristi


Dear Mr. Etter,

We recently received a letter from Victoria Michalowsky. She requested the opportunity to share her poem with our school. Victoria also wondered if we could post it at our school.

We would like to invite Victoria to read her poem to our kindergartners and then we would enjoy posting it so that others can read it.

Your name was given as the contact person. Please forward our invitation to Victoria.

Our office number is (503) 644-8407.

Sincerely,

Sarah Harris
Kathy Phillips
Co-Directors
A Child’s Way


Hi Glenn,
I am the owner and operator of the Ben and Jerry's Ice Cream and Frozen Yogurt Store in the Uptown Shopping Center. Hanna Sheikh was kind enough to send to us her recent "Ice Cream Poem ". Please ask her if it's ok to post this on our Community Board for all to see ? She did a great job and I thought that you should know. Please tell her that she is officially "published!" Please provide me with an address to send her a Free Ice Cream Cone Coupon for the good work.

Regards.
Peace, Love, and Ice Cream
Bruce Kaplan
Chief Euphoria Officer
Ben and Jerry's Portland
503 913-3094

 

Gambol a grand success, gross revenue up 20%

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Oh, What A Night it was!

The highlight of the April 2 auction at the Governor Hotel was a moving speech by Rachel Cohen ’90, who talked about being a Catlin Gabel "lifer." She spoke emotionally about how fortunate she was to attend Catlin Gabel thanks to financial aid. Rachel has spent the past 15 years working in international health and humanitarian aid, primarily with Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF). Rachel joined Drugs for Neglected Diseases initiative (DNDi) as the Regional Executive Director of DNDi North America in January. A great video about Rachel was produced for the Gambol.

» Watch the brief video about Rachel Cohen '90

Thank you to all the bidders, donors, volunteers, and supporters who made the Gambol festive and fruitful. We are pleased to share with you that the Gambol grossed $415,000 – a 20 percent increase over last year – for faculty professional development and the nearly 200 students on financial aid. We'll know net figures in late April when we finish accounting for expenses.

» Photo galleries of the party and the warm-up slide show of students of all ages

» Check out the online clearance auction — April 15 – 29
 

Why Give to the Annual Fund?

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By giving to the Annual Fund, you ensure excellence:

  • Academic distinction and the highest quality progressive education
  • Dedicated professionals who are immersed in the art and craft of teaching
  • Personalized attention, by which every child truly is the "unit of consideration" (Ruth Catlin, 1928)
  • A beautiful green campus that invites lifelong learning

Great schools don't just happen. We make them so.

Please give online before June 30, 2011. Thank you!
 

Change & Tradition from Those Who Know it Well--Our Board Chairs

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From the Winter 2010-11 Caller

The chairs of Catlin Gabel’s board of trustees play a crucial role in advancing the school’s mission; they bring the strongest of commitments to their position. What have our current and some of our former board chairs accomplished, what do they remember most proudly, and what are their visions for the school?

Ruth Ann Laster, 1980–83

What’s one wish or dream you have for Catlin Gabel?
I hope that the school always remembers its mission and focus. I am confident that it will remain a caring and creative environment. The school is remarkable because of its devotion to students and faculty. I am grateful that my own children were nurtured and educated so well at Catlin Gabel, and I wish the same for future generations.
 
What improvements have you seen in the school since your time on the board?
Overall, it seems more diverse. It’s terribly important to have students experience such diversity both within their own group and within the faculty.
 
What were the school’s most important fundraising goals at the time and how did you achieve them?
My recollection is that we aspired to keep the school on a sound footing as we prepared for the future—all resting on a commitment to excellence in substance and in spirit. I specifically remember the Rummage Sale: not only did it raise money, but it also brought the school together behind a common goal. One of my fondest memories is Sid Eaton collecting cans—he was ahead of his time. I think we all appreciated that raising money was important, but it was not an end in itself. Nevertheless, the board took fundraising very seriously.
 

Joey Day Pope ’54, 1988–90

What made you so committed?
My commitment to the school stems from its continuous adherence to the philosophy and mission articulated by Ruth Catlin in 1928, a statement that has held up through decades of scrutiny: a school where “each pupil is the unit of consideration” and which maintains “a liberal attitude towards ideas and fields of knowledge . . . in the search for truth and wisdom.”
 
What’s one wish or dream you have for Catlin Gabel?
My dream is that we continue to enroll both students who represent a cross-section of American life and those whom we used to term “children of promise” (not just the super bright, but those whose records and test scores upon entry may not portend the significant contributors they may be later in life).
 

Fletcher Chamberlin, 1990–93

What was your proudest board moment?
That moment came before I was chair, when I was treasurer: placing Howard Vollum’s bequest into the endowment and not into buildings. If we had spent the funds on buildings we may not have set our foundation for the endowment. His bequest changed everything.
 
What’s one wish or dream you have for Catlin Gabel? To keep doing what you’re doing and innovate. My three children were taught to have opinions and learned how to express them. They were taught how to think critically whether in writing or orally. They are three very different kids, but all got a great core education. I loved the most recent Caller on writing. That kind of education is fascinating to see from a 1st grader to an upper schooler. Keep innovating!
 
What improvements have you seen in the school since your time on the board?
Lark Palma’s intense focus on educational innovation. It’s even more powerful that what it used to be. I admire it.
 

Peter Krainock, 2001–04

What’s your proudest board accomplishment?
I am very proud of the set of fiscal procedures we implemented that changed how we budgeted for deferred maintenance costs. This was a tough decision that had powerful long-term effects. Without deferred maintenance the school would have ended up fundraising for costs that are not attractive to prospects and donors. I’ve sat on too many boards to realize not enough institutions do this, and I’m proud Catlin Gabel is one that does. I’m pleased to know our deferred maintenance budgeting is alive and well.
 
What’s one wish or dream you have for Catlin Gabel?
I wish the school will continue to search for board members who have divergent points of view—not just those who think the same way. Push and pull is tremendous. We had that on the executive committee, and it worked quite well.
 

Dave Cannard ’76, 2004–06

What’s one wish or dream you have for Catlin Gabel?
I hope Catlin Gabel remains true to its mission and roots as an experiential and experimental school, and that it continues to increase its accessibility to a broad range of students with different points of view. I’m happy to have participated in many of the discussions that continue and are enhanced today.
 
What improvements have you seen in the school since your time on the board?
I sense an increased awareness of financial assistance and accessibility, and it seems the board’s really focused and taken it to heart. It’s tremendous. During an economically challenging time the board stepped up and found additional funds for financial assistance. I’m pleased the school’s kept Lark Palma on as the head for continuity, leadership stability, and long-term success.
 
What made you so committed?
I deeply appreciate what the school did for me way back when, and what I’ve witnessed in my two sons made me and keeps me committed. I have a deep-seated awe for the work of the faculty with each child, and the commitment from the grounds crew to the head of school. I wanted to help support that and help make Catlin Gabel more available for more people. It was easy for me to commit.
 

John Gilleland, current board chair

What improvements have you seen in the school since you joined the board?
In my nine years on the board we have witnessed wonderful improvements in the Beehive, the Upper School library, our math and science buildings, the Dant House, and other facilities. Changes in our food service over the past several years have been great. We now have a bus commuter service, which was very much needed. Our curriculum continues to improve and evolve as it should to meet the demands of our shrinking world and expansion of a global economy. I see expansion in areas once not a part of our ongoing program becoming more integrated and expanded and highly successful, such as our outstanding robotics program. The dramatic growth in our financial assistance budget, while always in need of growing further, has been a blessing. Most know we increased our financial assistance budget by 44% over the past several years compared to 2007–08. The culture of the school regarding community involvement continues to evolve, with the volunteer efforts once devoted to Rummage now being expanded to a broader array of efforts. To speak in terms of our faculty and leadership, it is difficult to improve on excellence, but the best thing to know is we continue to attract top faculty and personnel when retirements or program changes occur. It has been a dramatic decade.
 
What wishes or dreams do you have for Catlin Gabel?
I dream that we continue to attract the financial resources to maintain our excellence in teaching and programs, which then makes Catlin Gabel the desired school for a diverse community of inspired families and students. I dream that we can match our programs with the related physical needs of our campus, including an Upper and Middle School creative arts building, an expansion of our robotics work areas, and beyond. I dream we will grow our endowment to a level that would support a vast expansion in our programs—a dramatic growth for the endowment fund.  

 

Community Warehouse Aided by CGS Volunteers

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From the Winter 2010-11 Caller

Some longtime Rummage volunteers have stepped in to help Community Warehouse, the NE Portland service organization run by Roz Nelson Babener ’68 that collects household items for families in need. After the last Rummage Sale they offered their skills to Roz, resulting in a volunteer-run garage sale area at the Warehouse location that raises funds for the organization. Roz and crew are now also collecting donations in a Westside dropoff location on SW Canyon Road. Household items that client families need are sent to the Warehouse, and other items will be sold in a rummage-type sale in November. The volunteer spirit abides!  

 

Alumni News Winter 2010-11

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From the Winter 2010-11 Caller

ALUMNI BOARD LEADERSHIP 2010–11

The alumni board welcomed 13 new members this year. We are grateful for their commitment to serve our alumni community. The board is composed of people who attended Catlin Gabel or any of its predecessor schools, and whose affection for Catlin Gabel leads them to continue their involvement. Board terms are a minimum of two years, and members participate in a variety of events throughout the year. If you are interested in joining the alumni board or in other alumni volunteer opportunities, email the alumni relations office at alumni@catlin.edu.
 
Markus Hutchins ’02, president; Susie Greenebaum ’05, secretary and events chair; Adam Keefer ’98, immediate past president; Lauren Dully Hubbard ’91, alumni relations director; Len Carr ’75, faculty-staff liaison; Maril Davis ’90, Los Angeles representative; Katey Jessen Flack ’97; Brian Jones ’88; Debbie Ehrman Kaye ’73; Emilie Lavin ’96; and Duncan McDonnell ’99.
New Members
Portland: Anna Campbell ’96, Bill Crawford ’97, Drew Fletcher ’02, Owen Gabbert ’02, David Reich ’80. San Francisco representatives: Sarah Arzt ’02, Peter Bromka ’00. New York representatives: Alex Bellos ’02, Emily Carr Bellos ’02. Seattle representatives: Jim Bilbao ’79, Alan Cantlin ’95, John Chun ’87. Los Angeles representative: Nick Toren ’91.

ALUMNI WEEKEND JUNE 17–19

Celebrating the 100th Anniversary of the Miss Catlin School All alumni are invited to attend. Honoring the classes of ’41, ’46, ’51, ’56, ’61, ’66, ’71, ’76, ’81, ’86, ’91, ’96, ’01, and ’06.
Friday, June 17
Annual alumni awards presentation with alumni associationhosted welcome back to campus dinner and lively music to follow in the Barn.
Saturday, June 18
Annual soccer game, retirement celebration for athletic director and coach Mike Davis with lunch in the Paddock, campus tours, family activities, challenge course, and class reunion parties.
Sunday, June 19
Brunch for all alumni in classes of 1941–61. Special anniversary celebration for classes of ’41, ’46, ’51, ’56, and ’61.

WE WANT YOUR NOTES

The class notes section of the Caller is one of the most popular with our alumni. We hear that it’s the first section alumni they read when their magazine arrives. Whether it’s a birth, a change of job or home, or just your thoughts on what the past year has been, a larger circle of folks really does want to share your passages with you! Visit www.catlin.edu/alumni to learn how submit a class note.
 

BABY PICTURES

Have you added an eagle to your nest? Send us an announcement and photo of your baby to alumni@catlin.edu and the alumni relations office will send your new babe a Catlin Gabel tee.
 
Markus Hutchins '02, alumni board president
Lauren Dully Hubbard '91, alumni and community relations program director

 

What's Next? The Catlin Gabel Service Corps Begins!

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A student and an alumnus talk about the joy of volunteering as a community

From the Winter 2010-11 Caller

The Catlin Gabel Service Corps debuted in October with three community-wide days of working together for the greater good. The Service Corps emerged from our community process to figure out “What’s Next” after the Rummage Sale. As we examined what we would miss most about Rummage, we came to consensus around several essential ingredients for developing a new tradition: multigenerations working side by side and having fun together, serving the greater Portland community, student leadership, and demonstrating who we are at Catlin Gabel. The Service Corps was developed with these elements in mind. You can find out more on our website. Since those fall service days, the Service Corps has also gathered 50 boxes of books from our community for children at Bienestar, a migrant worker housing complex in Hillsboro where our students help with their Homework Club. More events and projects are in the works—and we encourage all our community members, past and present, to come and pitch in, work together, and have fun.

The Energy and Fun of Volunteering
By Qiddist Hammerly ’12

As a Catlin Gabel student, I’ve participated in many activities at the Oregon Food Bank. In Lower School, we collected food during the fall harvest festival. In 8th grade, we participated in monthly service at the Food Bank, and in high school we often ask the students for food donations. These ordinary and expected contributions have made the Oregon Food Bank a familiar name to all Catlin Gabel students, yet I have never experienced it in the way I did with the Catlin Gabel Service Corps in November. As part of this year’s initiative to provide cross generational, community-building service opportunities, more than 75 students, parents, alumni, and faculty-staff joined together for a day of packing pasta— and it was anything but ordinary.

If one thing was exceptionally exciting about this service activity, it was the palpable energy of the kids. Eagerly running back and forth and lifting boxes almost bigger than themselves, the kids probably worked the hardest of anyone. For close to three hours, we packed boxes of various kinds of pasta in two-pound bags. At any given table, students, parents, teachers, and siblings worked side by side. Some kids eagerly scurried back and forth, providing each table with more empty boxes, and taking the full boxes to the growing tower of pasta.

The tangibility of our work made it appealing and rewarding for everyone; at the end of the day, we could look over and see just how many pounds we packed, and how many families we were feeding. One Lower School student checked the weight of each bag meticulously to make sure no one family would receive more food than another. Some of the adults, who seemed apprehensive about letting the kids handle tape guns and carry heavy boxes, grew impressed with their unfaltering persistence. Everyone joked and laughed while scooping bag after bag, and we even participated in some friendly competition, betting on whose table team could pack their boxes of pasta the fastest.

After we were done packing, we enjoyed a group lunch at McMenamin’s. It was only then that I realized how rare it is to see so many different Catlin Gabel constituencies in one place. I had the chance to catch up with one of my 1st grade teachers, make a new friend, and chat with parents. Enjoying lunch together wrapped up the day in the perfect way. Too often when we engage in service, we simply break off and return to our daily work without any processing or reflection. Having a relaxed meal together allowed everyone to reflect on the day, catch up, and enjoy each other’s company.

What made this day so successful was the connection we felt as we volunteered. We weren’t simply packing boxes of pasta: we were engaging with each other and observing the product of our work. I think this service experience provides a glimpse into the future possibilities of multigenerational service at Catlin Gabel, both on our own campus and in the greater community. Despite the occasionally excessive use of the word “community” in our, well, community, engaging in service as a community truly is a unique experience that exceeds the benefits of individual volunteerism. Looking back over my 12 years at the school, some of the memories that stand out most to me are the engaging service projects I participated in with my Catlin Gabel family. At the Food Bank that day I could clearly see in our students’ eyes that very same engagement and motivation.

Qiddist Hammerly is a junior at Catlin Gabel and a Malone Scholar. She has been involved for years in community service.
 

Connecting Through Tree-planting
By Markus Hutchins ’02

After the revelry of the previous night’s Homecoming victory (we defeated OES 2–0), I was excited to spend the day with fellow Eagles at the inaugural Catlin Gabel Service Corps outing to Mary Woodward Garden Wetlands. When we arrived, my parents and I were greeted by a warm cup of coffee and a big hug from Middle School head Paul Andrichuk. We introduced ourselves to our fellow and future alumni, received our assignments, and then headed out into the wetlands.
 
The tools were heavy but effective, and the task was hard but rewarding: removing non-native invasive plants and replacing them with native species and trees. Working alongside former teachers, parents, and current students was a pleasure, and providing our service to the greater community reminded me of the core values of Rummage. The clearing and planting activity was not limited to the Catlin Gabel community, so having the opportunity to work with others for the benefit of the great Portland ecology, knowing we represented one of our school’s core principles, was a positive experience and wonderfully rewarding.
 
Nostalgia was in attendance as well; while clearing ivy, a little girl shared her excitement about the 1st grade overnight. My own overnight trip was more than 19 years ago, yet I still remember my tentmates, where we camped, and the fun we had. Experiences outside the classroom are the fibers that shape Catlin Gabel. Similar moments and conversations always remind me how fortunate I am to have Catlin Gabel as the foundation of my education.
 
After the work was completed, our troop of volunteers piled back onto the school bus and shared lunch at a nearby restaurant. While relaxing and enjoying the sunny setting, I spoke with English teacher Art Leo and some parents of current students. We discussed Catlin Gabel, college admissions, sports, my career path, and a host of other topics. I found that sharing my own experience at the school, and its lasting impact on my life, was extremely rewarding. The parents seemed appreciative of the opportunity to speak in a relaxed forum. They asked many thought provoking questions, even some I later shared with fellow classmates. Crossgenerational discussions are unfortunately rare, but I hope that with the continuation and future growth of the Catlin Gabel Service Corps, these can occur on a more regular basis.
 
As I reflect on the day, I am thankful on multiple levels. Providing service to the community, interacting with current students and alumni, and sharing the experience with faculty and staff made for a true Catlin Gabel experience. I look forward to participating in many more Catlin Gabel Service Corps events in the future.
 
Markus Hutchins ’02 is the alumni board president and a member of the school’s board of trustees.

 

 

Catlin Gabel launches the Knight Family Scholars Program

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A new program for the Upper School will bring talented students and an emphasis on experiential learning

From the Winter 2010-11 Caller

This past fall, Phil and Penny Knight honored Catlin Gabel with the largest gift in the school’s history—a multimillion- dollar contribution for the new endowed Knight Family Scholars Program. The Knight’s unprecedented generosity is a tremendous vote of confidence in our school from world leaders in philanthropy.
 
“My goal is to honor the progressive ideals articulated by school founders Ruth Catlin and Priscilla Gabel—not by resting on our laurels, but by continuing to progress,” said head of school Lark Palma. “Phil and Penny Knight have given us the financial ability to try a new teaching and learning paradigm, see how it works, evaluate the program, and refine it over time. We have been given the opportunity to research, experiment, and stretch our wings in pursuit of improving education. We can be bold, like our students.
 
“The Knight Family Scholars Program will benefit all students through the innovations we pilot,” continued Lark. “The program also catapults Catlin Gabel’s visibility as one of the leading independent schools in the country, adds to our financial aid corpus, and will undoubtedly have a positive overall effect on admissions and on our ability to attract phenomenal student applicants. I could not be more delighted.”
 
“The Knight Family Scholars Program quite simply opens doors,” says Michael Heath, head of the Upper School. “It is a chance for us to grow as a school, to stretch our preconceptions of education and our assumptions about those we are educating. The scholars who attend Catlin Gabel every year will gain much from their opportunity, but I think we will learn as much from them, if not more.”
 
This Q&A by communications director Karen Katz ’74 with head of school Lark Palma explains more about this new program.
 
What is the Knight Family Scholars Program?
It is a pilot program for the Upper School faculty to explore a new model for high school education and attract outstanding new high school students. The gift funds an endowed faculty member to direct the program and teach in the Upper School. In the anticipated inaugural year, 2012–13, we hope to enroll about four Knight Family Scholars as fully integrated members of the Upper School student body who benefit from our exceptional curriculum. The Knight Family Scholars Program is similar in concept to the Rhodes Scholar program in terms of the caliber of students who will qualify.
 
What is your vision for how this program will affect Catlin Gabel?
The current generation of students is far more sophisticated than previous generations. Their educational needs are evolving quickly. Educators must ask, what more can we do to prepare them? How can we ensure that they have a great liberal arts and sciences foundation for success in college, plus the experience and skills to thrive in a workforce and world that will change in ways we cannot imagine? Catlin Gabel teachers have envisioned a high school that is more real world, project based, experiential, and interdisciplinary—but limited resources have stymied our progress toward this goal. Now we can take some big steps in building on our curricular innovations and evolve more quickly. As a new Catlin Gabel faculty member, the Knight Family Scholars Program director will collaborate with our high school teachers and students to develop methods of teaching and learning that respond to the changing educational environment.
 
Where did the idea for the program originate?
The genesis for the program stems from the Imagine 2020 conference held in the spring of 2006. A lasting idea that emerged from the conference was to enrich Catlin Gabel’s educational offerings by taking advantage of what our great city and region have to offer— using Portland as a learning laboratory. Bringing students together with creative, analytical, medical, political, entrepreneurial, and science leaders would further our experiential and progressive education goals. The intent is to get our students “off the hill,” as one alumnus put it in 2006. Our global education and PLACE programs, and the urban studies class in the Upper School, also stem from the Imagine 2020 conference.
 
How did this gift come about?
As I got to know Phil, our shared interest in improving education emerged as a vitally important theme. Phil and Penny Knight are long-range visionaries and Oregon’s most generous individual education philanthropists, which is humbling and exciting. We talked about Ruth Catlin’s vision of modeling for others and how, because of our relatively small size, our success, and our focus on progressive education, we are the ideal school for innovation. I described some of the seminal ideas that emerged from the Imagine 2020 conference and how hard our teachers work to implement those ideas.
 
Can you give us an example of a program feature from Imagine 2020 that this gift allows us to implement?
The faculty and the program director will have the opportunity to advance the exchange of ideas in seminars taught by a network of community experts, including some of our talented and notable parents, alumni, and grandparents. The seminars, both on and off campus, will examine topics that emerge from the shared interests of the students and the director as they move through the program together. The seminars will also respond to the availability of influential mentors, speakers, and guest instructors. Upper School students, not just Knight Family Scholars, will be able to attend seminars. It is vitally important that this is open and inclusive, and that we prevent any kind of “us and them” dynamic. We also expect that as the program grows, it will include opportunities for the Knight Scholars to travel nationally and abroad for summer learning.
 
How else does the program benefit current students?
The research is clear: high caliber students raise the level of learning for everyone. The positive peer effect is evident throughout our school. Students in our supportive, noncompetitive environment engage more deeply when their classmates are excited about the lab, discussion, problem solving, or literary analysis at hand. And, naturally, teachers are at their best when their students are highly engaged.
 
What are the student qualifications for the program?
Prospective Knight Family Scholars Program participants will stand out in four key areas: academics, community service, athletics, and leadership. As Knight Scholars they will receive tuition assistance funded by the program’s endowment. The amount of assistance will depend on their families’ need. The program will attract well-rounded students who will inspire their peers, take advantage of everything Catlin Gabel has to offer, and go on to serve their communities.
 
Can current Catlin Gabel students apply for Knight scholarships?
Current and former Catlin Gabel students are ineligible to become Knight Scholars because one objective of the program is to attract new students and deepen our pool of admitted students. The Knight Scholars Program will raise the profile of our excellent Upper School and entice students who will be wonderful additions to our community.
 
Who determines who qualifies for the program?
The faculty, admission office, and a new program director will decide whom we accept.
 
Who is the Knight Family Scholars Program director and how is the position funded?
Typically, when donors make large gifts to institutions they fund a position to oversee the program. We will launch a national search for a Knight Family Scholars Program director to fully realize the vision of this program. The director will be Catlin Gabel’s first endowed faculty member. This turning point for Catlin Gabel could very well lead to additional endowed faculty positions.
 
What are the director’s responsibilities?
First and foremost, the director will find the right students for the program. A big part of the job is outreach and making a wide range of communities aware of the program and our school. As the program spokesperson, the director will bolster the Knight Family Scholars Program and our overall admission program. The director will also lead the scholars’ seminar and teach other Upper School classes so he or she is fully integrated into our faculty. We will hire a dynamic educator who becomes a vital member of our school community.
 
How will this historic gift change the school?
When we laid out strategic directions in 2003, one of our top three goals was to strengthen our identity and visibility in the community. We set out to identify and attract qualified, informed, and diverse applicants and to increase our applicant pool, particularly in the Upper School. The Knight Family Scholars Program will move us quickly and decisively towards these goals.
 
Has Catlin Gabel ever received a gift of this magnitude?
In 1987, the school received a $3.6 million bequest from the estate of Howard Vollum that allowed Catlin Gabel to establish an endowment fund. His foresight and generosity moved the school beyond a paycheck-to-paycheck lifestyle.
 
What other benefits does the Knights’ gift offer?
The Knight Family Scholars Program raises our visibility as one of the leading independent schools in the country. On a purely financial and pragmatic level, the program releases financial aid dollars for students in all divisions. On a more philosophical and curricular level, the Knight Family Scholars Program will stretch us to take some risks about how we teach. All Catlin Gabel students will benefit from the innovations we pilot through the program. On a grander scale, my dream is to model innovations that can benefit students nationwide. We cannot underestimate the value of raising our profile, too. What’s good for Catlin Gabel’s reputation is good for Catlin Gabel’s students and teachers. As far as fundraising goes, this is the tip of the iceberg for all programs and needs of the school. I know Phil and Penny Knight’s generosity and confidence in Catlin Gabel will inspire others to give. In fact, two other donors are planning to contribute to this program. We anticipate a positive overall effect on admissions and on our ability to attract phenomenal student applicants. Some great young people, who perhaps don’t qualify as Knight Family Scholars, will still apply to our Upper School when they learn about Catlin Gabel’s curriculum, meet our faculty and students, and hear about our generous financial assistance program.
 
Is this Phil and Penny Knight’s first gift to Catlin Gabel?
In the past three years, the Knights have quietly and generously funded other immediate needs that I identified. They were instrumental in our ability to provide financial aid for families who have struggled through the recession. I am so honored that they have put their trust in me and in Catlin Gabel.