Athletics News

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We encourage all students to join a Catlin Gabel team. Each year a number of students, particularly freshmen and sophomores, hesitate to come out for sports, believing they are too inexperienced to participate. Our no-cut policy allows for everyone to participate. We provide great opportunities for students to give new sports a try. You have nothing to lose and a lot to gain. We hope to see you!

Upper School Athletics 2012-13 Preseason Schedule

Soccer, volleyball, and cross-country preseason practice begins on Monday, August 20.

For conditioning, skill development, and team organization, athletes planning to participate in the first fall contests are required to attend preseason practices. Athletes missing prac¬tices or arriving after the starting date will be withheld from competitions until they have completed nine practices. If teams are filled after preseason is completed, we will not add another team to accommodate late arriving athletes.

Games begin on August 30. Coaches will notify athletes in advance of any practice time changes after this point.

Once classes begin on September 6, practices are after school from 3:30 to 5:30 p.m. There is no practice on Labor Day.

» Link to game and meet schedules

BOYS SOCCER

Optional camp – $100
August 13 – 17, 3:30 – 5:30 p.m.

Required practice and team selection
Monday, August 20 – September 5, 3 – 6 p.m. (laptop orientation is on Wednesday, September 5, at 6 p.m., so practice will be earlier)
Head Coach: Roger Gantz, 503-780-3312

GIRLS SOCCER

Optional camp – $175
August 13 – 16, 5:30 – 7:30 p.m.

Required practice and team selection
Monday, August 20 – September 5, 9 – 11 a.m.
Head Coach: Lisa Unsworth, 503-593-1173

GIRLS VOLLEYBALL

Optional conditioning – free
August 6 – 9, 9 – 10:30 a.m. and 6 – 7:30 p.m.

Optional camp – $100
August 13 – 16, 4 – 7pm

Required practice and team selection
August 20 – 23, 3 – 7:30 p.m.
August 24, 3 – 6 p.m.
August 27 – 29, 4 – 6p.m.
August 30, first game at home vs. Astoria
Head Coach Sanjay Bedi, 503-348-0380

CROSS-COUNTRY

Optional practices
Wednesdays from 7 to 8 p.m. for interval session. Meet at the gym.
Saturdays at 9 a.m. for 3-6 mile run. Meet at the bottom of the Leif Erickson Trail on NW Thurman Street
Monday August 13 - 24th annual Oak Hills pre-season run, swim, and ice cream social 7 – 9 p.m.

Required practice
August 20 – September 5
Monday, Wednesday, Friday, 9:30 – 11 a.m.
Head Coach: John Hamilton, 503-645-7198

Notes for All Athletes

Students should have their own footwear properly broken in by the opening day of practice to avoid blisters. Wear athletic clothes suitable for the weather. Soccer players should bring water bottles to carry with them to the field. It is wise to start some conditioning well before August 20 in order to build fitness gradually. This will help avoid muscle soreness and injuries.

Family medical and emergency contact forms must be submitted online before the first day of practice. Update or approve your forms online. Also, all 9th and 11th graders must complete the pre-participation physical examination with their physicians and turn in the required paperwork before the first day of practice. State law requires the school to have the forms on file before students may practice. The forms are available in PDF format at the bottom of this page. Please call the Upper School office at ext. 315 if you have any questions about the forms.

For questions or clarification about the athletics program please email or call Sandy Luu, athletic director, at luus@catlin.edu or 971-404-7253.

 

Longtime soccer coach Brian Gant interviewed on Portland Timbers website

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Portland Timbers website, May 2012

Senior Mariah Morton wins long and triple jump championships, girls 4x400 team wins at state

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In addition to winning two state championships as an individual competitor, Mariah was also a member of the championship 4x400m relay team along with freshman Adele English, senior Cammy Edwards, junior Fiona Noonan, and sophomore Gabby Bishop.

The girls 4x100m relay team took 2nd place with runners Mariah Morton, Adele English, Cammy Edwards, junior Audrey Davis, and freshman Talia Quatraro.

Cammy Edwards placed 2nd in both the 300m hurdles and the high hurdles.

Junior Hannah Jaquiss placed 3rd in the 3000m and 7th in the 1500.

Junior Mckenzie Spooner placed 6th in the 3000.

Junior Hannah Rotwein placed 6th in the 1500.

The girls track team came in 2nd at state.

Senior Parris Joyce took 3rd place in the boys 800.

Senior Eli Wilson Pelton placed 6th in the high hurdles and 7th in the 300 hurdles.

Junior David Lovitz took 8th in the high jump.

Sophomore Ian Smith, Eli Wilson Pelton, Parris Joyce, David Lovitz, sophomore Chris Belluschi, and junior Cody Hoyt placed 7th in the 4x100 relay.

Senior Kate Rubinstein took 2nd place at the state tennis tournament.

Senior Andrew Salvador took 2nd place in tennis.

The doubles tennis team of junior Evan Hallmark and senior Sammy Lubitz finished 3rd at state.

The boys tennis team took 2nd place at state.

 

Chris Skrapits named district coach of the year

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Congratulations, Chris!

In his first season as head track and field coach, Chris was selected tops in the district.

Girls track team wins district championship

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Go Eagles!

The district meet saw standout performances and personal records for a number of students. The boys placed 3rd – their best showing in years – and 17 students are advancing to state.

Middle School track meet photo gallery

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Catlin Gabel hosted the 38th annual Middle School invitational track meet with 14 schools from Oregon and Washington

Thank you, Carolyn Heymann, for the photos!

Chris Skrapits selected assistant coach of the year

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Congratulations, Chris! You make us proud.

The Oregon Athletic Coaches Association has selected eighth grade science teacher and ace cross-country coach Chris Skrapits as the assistant coach of the year in Oregon for all sports categories in the 3A classification.

PE teacher and coach John Hamilton submitted this nomination:

Chris came to Catlin Gabel in 1996. He had been a cross-country runner during high school and college. Not long after starting to work on our campus he connected with me to see if he could participate in our team workouts. He became a frequent participant in many of our on campus sessions, and eventually began to join us for trail runs.

In 2004 we lost our assistant coach, and invited Chris to become an official part of our program. He was more than ready, and eagerly accepted the offer. Having him become a permanent member of our [coaching] staff has proved to be a huge boost to the program on many levels. He helps me organize the overview of the full season training schedule. He in charge of all our team warm-up drills prior to all training and racing sessions. This means his voice is the only one that the racers hear as they enter the chute on race day. He has continued to be an active participant in most of our training sessions and leads all the abdominal work at the end of each training session. I will ask him to step out of a session when I need his help with timing, or watching for form and tactical adjustments we might want to make. The entire team loves the energy, enthusiasm, knowledge, experience, and the joy he brings to the team.

During the eight years Chris has been with the team we have grown from 24 participants to 38, a 55% increase. More than 14% of Upper School students are on the cross-country team. During Chris’ tenure as assistant coach, the program has achieved a level of success that we had never before experienced. The team won seven out of eight district titles. Racing in Eugene at LCC, the Catlin Gabel team has finished in the top two for consecutive years, runners-up four times, and state champions four times.

 

Creating Positive Change in Our Athletes

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An athletics program based on character

From the Winter 2011-12 Caller

By Sandy Luu, Catlin Gabel athletics director

Character development is my top priority as I guide Catlin Gabel’s coaches and student athletes—and I would like to see excellence in all athletic programs at Catlin Gabel. In my career I have seen many coaches who taught physical skills—but thought that the development of character would just naturally arise from being part of a team. To develop athletes of character, we need to intentionally teach the skills that will help them make choices based on beliefs and principles. Our job is to build habits in our athletes that will help them make tough choices, and to consistently follow through with them.
 
Wouldn’t it be great if we could all be great athletes and win every game we play? Unfortunately, just like other areas in life, it’s not always easy, and we have to work at it. When athletes have to sit on the bench for the first time, they learn to be better teammates. When they have to battle injury for the first time, they learn to push themselves harder than they have before. The resiliency we learn through sports will last a lifetime. Take our boys varsity soccer team, for example. Last year they won the state championship and graduated 11 seniors off that team. This year they had a new coach, Roger Gantz ’89, and only three seniors. At the beginning of the season I watched these three seniors as they rallied their young teammates, learning what it takes to become leaders from Roger and from one another. They had tough losses, but they learned more about each other as they went through the semester. I was pleased by the growth that I saw as this team came together and learned to trust and rely on each other.
 
Our primary goal in athletic programs is to love and care about the kids we work with. I learned its importance personally, in my first experience with high school sports. After my father died when I was in 8th grade, one of the many changes in our lives was that I had to go to a new high school as a freshman, in our town near Sacramento, California. I had just grown five inches and turned from a confident athlete who was a leader on the court to a nervous, awkward new kid on the block. After the first volleyball practice, the coach cut me from the team, saying, “Sandy, unfortunately, you don’t have a future in volleyball.” He didn’t know about the difficult transitions I had gone through; he was only worried about having the best team out on the court. I learned that I had to be resilient and not feel sorry for myself. If I was going to make it happen, I had to work hard. I ended up playing junior and senior years on the varsity team (and also played basketball and softball) and received a scholarship to play at Concordia University. If I had listened to that first coach and stopped playing the sport I loved, my life would be very different today. I want to make sure we don’t have any kids who are made to feel the way I did. In one of the schools where I worked before Catlin Gabel, we had a sports team that was dysfunctional on and off the court. We made a difficult decision to replace the coach. I told the new coach that I hoped to see character growth as his number one priority. After losing the first three games, he came into my office, dispirited, slumping in his chair. I assured him that the team would improve as soon as he helped them learn to be better friends and teammates. Over the next two years, he helped them grow into one of the best teams that school had ever seen. He held them accountable for any negative behavior and taught them how to be good basketball players, but more importantly, to be athletes of character.
 
Coaches are the key to creating positive change in our athletes. This begins with modeling respect and responsibility. Coaches share their vision of what is right, teaching confidence, commitment, and the importance of fulfilling obligations. The daily lessons we teach about being ethical are as essential as the training we do in each sport. Developing these lessons such as honesty and responsibility will last much longer than any championships Catlin Gabel wins.
 
During my last year at Liberty High School in Hillsboro, the new head baseball coach’s team lost their first nine pre-season games. I told him that, even if it was difficult, to exude as much positive energy as he could muster. I asked him to remember that it’s great to win, but that winning is the icing on the cake—that character development was our goal. He went back and told his team that he believed in them, and he stayed optimistic. It paid off in the end: they went on a winning streak and ended up only one game away from making playoffs. The boys never gave up, and I was really proud of that. These athletes learned to overcome, rather than hanging their heads low and blaming the new coach, or each other. It’s easy to fall into that trap, but we want to teach our athletes about resiliency.
 
I am tremendously encouraged by what I have seen at Catlin Gabel during my first year here. I spent the first half of the year observing our teams and our coaches. I asked questions about character, and I have been impressed with the answers. The coaching staff has impressed me with their ability to relate with the athletes; it is clear that they truly care about our kids. The athletes here have a strong work ethic and show a tremendous amount of trust and care for each other.
 
I would love to see our students participating and contributing to our program all year long. It is important that we build a strong connection to younger students so that they feel more connected to our program.
 
To make Catlin Gabel athletics the best it can be, we need the best coaches guiding our athletes, great athletic facilities, and students willing to become athletes of character. One head coach said it best—we should strive to make Catlin Gabel athletics as amazing as our academic program. It’s wonderful at Catlin Gabel to see alumni coming back to campus to shoot around with their coaches, attend games, and spend time with current athletes. Our coaches understand how important it is to find the connection and build on it. I’ll definitely be part of continuing this tradition. I look forward, as the years go by, to hearing about our students’ successes—and their important challenges—as they go through their lives.
 
Sandy Luu has been athletic director at Catlin Gabel since August 2011. She played volleyball, basketball, and fast pitch softball during her years at Concordia University and earned a master’s in athletic administration from Ohio University. She taught and coached in China, Vietnam, and Taiwan for 13 years while she lived there with her family. In Taiwan, she served as athletic director for middle and high schools.

 

Girls basketball team win featured in Portland Tribune

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Portland Tribune article, February 2012

Ski program information

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Welcome to the 2012 ski program!

Carefully review this article, download the emergency medical form posted at the bottom of the page, and register online with Mt. Hood Meadows.

The Catlin Gabel ski bus runs on six Saturdays: February 4, 11, 18, 25, and March 3 and 10.

This Catlin Gabel ski program is supervised by faculty members from all divisions and lessons are taught by Mt. Hood Meadows ski and snowboard instructors. The program is open only to Catlin Gabel students in 5th through 12th grades. The transportation fee for the six week program is $150, payable by check to Catlin Gabel. Lift, lesson, and rental fees are payable to Mt. Hood Meadows through their online registration.

Transportation and supervision

Catlin Gabel buses transport participating students to and from Mt. Hood Meadows. The bus drivers are Catlin Gabel employees. Chaperones ride each bus and are available in the lodge at most but not all times.

Buses leave Catlin Gabel campus at 6:30 a.m. sharp. At the end of the ski day, the buses leave Mt. Hood Meadows at 3:30 p.m., returning to Catlin Gabel by 5:30 p.m.

All students must return via the Catlin Gabel bus unless alternative transportation is prearranged by parents/guardians. Chaperones must receive a note signed by a parent/guardian detailing the alternative transportation arrangements.

Drop-in skier information

Transportation and supervision are available to skiers who can only attend one or two Saturdays. However, we recommend signing up for the full program if you plan to ski more than twice because the unused days on the tickets are good until the end of the ski season.

The drop-in fee is $30 payable in cash or check on the day of attendance. Drop-in skiers must purchase their own lift and/or lesson tickets. Please rent equipment in advance in the Portland area. Beginning and first-season skiers are not permitted to use the drop-in system.

The Catlin Gabel emergency medical form is required for all drop-in skiers. Extra forms are available in each of the division offices and posted at the bottom of this page. The form may be filled out ahead of time or brought with the skier on the day of attendance. We cannot accept phoned in permission.

Registration

Four forms are due to Kathy Sloan inthe Upper School by Friday, January 13: the Catlin Gabel medical release form posted below,  the Mt. Hood Meadows release form, the Mt. Hood Meadows medical form, and, if renting, the Mt. Hood Meadows rental form. The Mt. Hood Meadows forms will be sent after you complete their online registration.

There are two separate components to registration.
You must do both by Friday, January 13!

Complete the Mt. Hood Meadows online registration as follows:

1. Go to www.skihood.com/go
2. Enter the GO code for Catlin Gabel in the GO code Box. Our GO Code is: 1024713.
3. Select the package you wish to purchase. Grades 5-8 are “Trailblazers,” grades 9-12 are “High School.” Trailblazers MUST sign up for lessons. This is a Catlin Gabel requirement.
6. Check out.
After registering, you will receive a confirmation email and the Mt. Hood Meadows forms mentioned above.

Complete the Catlin Gabel medical release form at the bottom of this page and return the following in hard copy to Kathy Sloan in the Upper School:

  • Mt. Hood Meadows medical form
  • Mt. Hood Meadows release form
  • Mt. Hood Meadows rental form (if renting)
  • Catlin Gabel emergency medical release form (download from this web page)
  • Check for $150 made payable to Catlin Gabel.

Financial aid is available directly through the ski bus program for students who need it and are committed to attending all six weeks. This financial aid does not come through the admission and financial aid office. Please contact Kathy Sloan directly to inquire about financial aid. To apply, send an e-mail with your request to sloank@catlin.edu indicating how much financial support it would take to make the program affordable for you.


Program guidelines – read these carefully!

  • Be on time. Please arrive at 6:15 a.m. to load skis and get seated on the bus. The bus leaves campus promptly at 6:30 a.m. and returns to Catlin Gabel by 5:30 p.m. Parents/guardians, please be on time to pick up your skier(s) at the end of the day.
  • Lessons are required for all participants in 5th through 8th grades. They are optional for high school participants. Lessons are approximately two hours. Prior to and after lessons, participants are “free skiing.” Although program rules require skiing with a partner, participants are not supervised by chaperones while on the slopes.
  • Skiers are required to travel both directions on the same bus. There will be chaperones on each bus and in the lodge at most but not all times. In the morning, buses drop students at the lodge, and at the end of the ski day students walk to the buses parked in the parking lot by 3:15 p.m. Failure to return to the bus on time causes worry and delay for everyone. Late skiers could be dropped from the ski program the following week.
  • All skiers are expected to honor the rules and regulations governing the use of lifts, slopes, and lodges as posted by Mt. Hood Meadows. Failure to comply will result in dismissal from the program.
  • All skiers are expected to honor the rules and regulations of Catlin Gabel School in terms of our drug and alcohol policy. Failure to comply will result in dismissal from the program.and disciplinary action taken at school.
  • We strongly encourage all skiers and snowboarders to wear helmets although this is not mandatory. In addition, wrist guards for snowboarders will help prevent wrist injuries.
  • Loading and unloading equipment and cleaning the bus at the end of the day is everyone’s responsibility. No one should leave the campus until the buses are empty and cleaned.
  • Concern for others is an essential part of the ski program while on our way to and from Mt Hood Meadows and while at the ski area. We have been justifiably proud of the Catlin Gabel students in the past and have had numerous great seasons. We hope you can be a part of the best season yet!

We ask all students and parents to join in our commitment for the safest and most enjoyable ski program possible.

Ski program leaders: Kathy Sloan, Len Carr, Chris Bell, Peggy McDonnell, Bob Sauer, Larry Hurst, Paul Monheimer, Aline Garcia-Rubio, and Spencer White

 

 

CG letter jackets available now

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We are partnering with LaHaie’s, an Oregon family-owned business, to make a Catlin Gabel letter jacket. LaHaie’s uses northwest-produced 100% wool fabric. The jackets are manufactured in Portland, and all patches and embroidery are locally made.

LaHaie’s will be on campus with sample jackets on Monday, December 5, from 3 to 4:30 p.m. in the gym. If you would like to check sizes, they will make note if it for future orders. If you are ready to order now, they can help you.

The jackets come in many different sizes, including children’s sizes for Beehivers.

You may purchase the jacket alone, or add any of the patches listed below.

Base price for letter jacket: $177

Add patches on the front
First and/or last name: $22
Blue varsity letter: provided by student (no charge)
White JV/activity letter: $15
Graduation year: $24

Add patches on the back
Catlin Gabel: $44
Eagle mascot: $85
“Eagles” script: $44

Add sleeve patch only
Tree logo: $39

Sewing patches on: $40

Total for jacket with patches on front and sleeve only: $300
Total for jacket with all patches: $475

Order jackets at LaHaie's Jackets, 503-648-2341
 

Interview with new athletic director

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Meet Sandy Luu

Athletic director Sandy Luu came to Catlin Gabel this year from Liberty High School in Hillsboro, where she was AD of their large 5A program. An Oregon native, Sandy previously served as athletic director at Morrison Academy International School in Taichung, Taiwan. Originally a 6th grade language arts and math teacher, she has also taught in Vietnam and China. We caught up with Sandy to find our how things are going for her at Catlin Gabel.

How’s Catlin Gabel treating you?

I have really enjoyed my first few months here. The people are amazing—just as advertised. The faculty and staff really care about the students, and about their colleagues. Everyone is so complimentary of each other’s strengths. They feed off each other in a very positive way. People here told me before I was hired that they love coming to work each and every day. I fully agree.

Tell us about your background and how you became an athletic director.

Sports have shaped my life. Growing up I played as much as I could, even persuading the middle school athletic director to let me participate on the 7th grade team as a 5th grader. In college I played varsity fast pitch softball, basketball, and volleyball, but I love all sports. I have coached basketball, softball, and volleyball. I studied education in college and taught for many years, but started moving toward athletic administration when I was in Taiwan. Coaching coaches and organizing sports really appeals to me. I took classes at Ohio University during summer vacations and earned a master’s in athletics administration.

What is your general philosophy about the role of athletics in schools?

I believe in character-based athletics. Catlin Gabel has a great tradition of winning the right way, and I want to continue this. The character development is paramount; the wins are icing on the cake. Sports are an extension of the classroom and teach lessons about how to be a good teammate and the value of hard work. Athletics builds confidence and self esteem. The skills you learn through sports will help you now and serve you well later in life. Employers look for people who know how to lead as well as people who can be good teammates. They want people who have handled loss and experienced success.

What advice would you offer athletes and their parents who think CG’s high school athletic program is too small for colleges to take notice of a star athlete?

College coaches are looking for one thing: talented athletes. They are not as interested in the size of the school or how well the school team did in recent seasons. They are really looking for potential. Being a talented student-athlete at Catlin Gabel can have a lot of advantages. You can assume a leadership role and have a great chance to earn a starting position. One of the greatest benefits here is personal attention from coaches and teachers.

Is it a disadvantage for outstanding athletes to compete at a small school if they hope for an athletic scholarship?

The advantage you gain at Catlin Gabel is the level of academics. The education you receive here is unmatched. The benefit you will have is in the transcript you provide, along with your athletic résumé. I don’t think people understand how few scholarships are available for Division I and II sports. A fully financed Division I soccer program can offer 9.9 full rides, but they split these up among all of their players (as many as 25 or 30), which leaves some players with very small scholarships. Often, Division III schools are the best places to receive scholarships. These schools don’t offer athletic scholarships, but they routinely give merit awards for academic and other accomplishments. The merit scholarships that private colleges award can be a significant percentage of tuition.

What are some of the differences between being AD at a large school like Liberty HS in Hillsboro and a small school like CG?

Going from nearly 1,400 students to 300 is a big transition. CG’s smaller program is one of the main reasons I applied for this job. I love to work with kids and build relationships with them. In a large school, the athletic director is mainly a scheduler, and most of my time was spent making sure everyone was where they needed to be. At Catlin Gabel, I can get to know the students and make sure all of the coaches are contributing to students’ lives in positive ways. I can have more of an impact.

What have you found most challenging in your new job?

In my past school, I only had high school sports. Here at CG, there are more sports teams at different levels, so have many more balls in the air. Everyone in the PE department and the coaches have been incredibly helpful and supportive. I couldn’t ask for a better group to work with.

How are your sons Trevor (a junior) and Max (a freshman) adjusting?

Catlin Gabel is a great fit for Trevor and Max. They love it here; it reminds them of the school they attended for seven years in Taiwan. They will probably hate me talking about them, but CG has been a huge blessing for my boys. The individualized instruction is unmatched. I just attended my first parent-teacher conferences and was blown away. After just two-and-a-half months their teachers have my boys figured out. I also attended a couple of senior athletes’ conferences, and the general theme from parents was thankfulness. They appreciate the time teachers put into the kids. They know that CG has shaped the people their children have become. I couldn’t ask for more for my own boys.

What have you liked most about Catlin Gabel so far?

The school transforms lives. I have been most impressed by how the faculty treats each student as an individual and how well they know each child’s strengths and weaknesses. Teachers and staff work hard at building relationships with their students daily. I have never seen anything like this at any of the other schools I have worked at. Teachers are interested in many aspects of their student’s lives. It’s impressive to see so many faculty and staff members out watching extracurricular activities. I have also been impressed with the students. They are refreshingly polite, friendly, and selfless. They are always ready to lend a hand and pitch in, whether for service day, or just to help put away sports gear.

» Return to December 2011 All-School News

Girls soccer team playing OES for state championship Saturday

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Congratulations Eagles!

Girls Soccer Final
Saturday, November 19
10:30 a.m.
Liberty High School

Join us for this exciting match as the varsity girls soccer team faces their friendly rivals for the state title.

Every CG voice is needed.

» Learn the school spirit song

Admission: Cash or VISA/MasterCard only | Adult $8 | Student $5

Can't attend the game? » Check out the webcast on OSAA.tv

 

Sophomore Mckenzie Spooner invited to run at Nike competition

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Mckenzie is among the top 40 girl cross-country runners in Oregon to compete against the top 40 girls from Washington at the 13th annual Border Clash. The Nike-sponsored event is on Saturday, November 20.

Calling all fans to the last home varsity boys soccer game Friday

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Come support the seniors at their last home game of the season. Cheer on the mighty Eagles at 4:15 p.m.

CGS teams run with world champions at Nike

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On October 20, students on Catlin Gabel cross country teams had the opportunity to meet all of the professional runners from the Nike Oregon Project and run with them on the wood chip trails surrounding Nike’s campus. After an introduction to all of the professional athletes by head coach Alberto Salazar, the cross-country team headed out for a few miles around the Beaverton campus.

 
Some of the athletes who guided the students around Nike’s campus included Mo Farah, gold and silver medalist at the World Championships in August; Galen Rupp, American record holder in the 10,000 meters and five-time NCAA champion; Kara Goucher, bronze medalist at the World Championships and three-time NCAA champion; and Dathan Ritzenhein, Olympian and NCAA champion, among others. Alberto Salazar, himself a three-time New York City Marathon champion and Boston Marathon champion, now coaches the Nike Oregon Project with the goal of developing the world’s best athletes to win medals at the World Championships and Olympic games.
 
Catlin Gabel’s cross country team members were able to ask the athletes questions as they explored the trails on campus and after finishing up their run. The students were incredibly inspired from this meeting and are now ready to convert some of that enthusiasm into results at the upcoming district and state championships in the coming weeks. Knight Family Scholars director and MS cross country coach Chad Faber said, “Our kids get the chance to run with the world’s best athletes today and watch them compete for and win medals at next summer’s Olympic Games in London. I can’t think of any experience more exciting for a student-athlete.”