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History Bowl team advances to nationals

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Bravo!

Catlin Gabel's inaugural History Bowl team, at its first competition, qualified for the National History Bowl by placing 2nd in the junior varsity division at regionals. Team members Adolfo Apolloni, Daniel Chiu, Ian Hoyt, Julian Kida, and Andrew Park (all 9th graders) will travel with club advisor Peter Shulman to the national competition in Washington, D.C., in April.

The team members also participated as individuals in the closely related History Bee, and all five qualified for the national History Bee. Daniel Chiu placed 3rd and Ian Hoyt placed 5th.

Upper School teacher publishes curriculum guide for wide distribution

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Upper School teacher and PLACE urban studies director George Zaninovich collaborated with alumna Erin Goodling '99 to produce a curriculum guide for educators, activists, community leaders, and, above all, students. The 121-page guidebook is an outgrowth of Catlin Gabel's PLACE urban studies and leadership program. We are grateful to George and Erin for walking our talk of being a model for progressive education.

The free curriculum guide is posted on our website. We are eager to share this work with others. 
Help spread the word.

Girls soccer team advances to state quarterfinals

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Go Eagles!

The girls beat Umatilla  8-0 on Tuesday.

They play Western Mennonite on Saturday, November 9, at noon at Amity High School

» Link to Google map

Varsity teams celebrate successful weekend

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Congratulations to both the boys and girls cross-country teams, and the girls soccer team

Cross-Country

The boys took 3rd place in state with freshman Max Fogelstrom placing 17th overall.

The girls took 6th in state with freshman Samantha Slusher finishing in 5th place and freshman Grace Masback in 15th. Samantha qualified for the Nike Border Clash race on November 23.

The Oregonian newspaper named Samantha the Beaverton leader athlete of the week. »Link to article. They also ran a fun story about Samantha’s broken medal. »Link to article. 

Soccer

The girls soccer team qualified for the state playoffs when they defeated Westside Christian, 1-0. Their opening match is on Tuesday at 4:30 p.m. here at Catlin Gabel. Come cheer on the mighty Eagles as they face the Umatilla Vikings!
Students $4
Adults $6

MS boys soccer team wins 2nd consecutive league championship

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Way to go, Eagles!

In the final game of the season, Catlin Gabel beat OES in penalty kicks after battling it out in regulation time and two overtime periods. The future looks bright! 

Varsity cross-country teams qualify for state

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Congratulations to the boys and girls teams!

Freshman Samantha Slusher won the district championship with a season best time of 19:34.

The top 10 placers at districts were

Girls: #1 Samantha Slusher, #3 Grace Masback, and #5 Kelsey Hurst

Boys: #5 Max Fogelstrom, #7 Garet Neal, and #10 Luca Ostertag-Hill

The state championships are on Saturday, November 2. For more information, go to http://www.osaa.org/docs/bxc/xcspecinfo.pdf

Seniors and 1st graders pumpkin carving photo gallery

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The classes of 2014 and 2025 lucked out with plenty of sunshine for their trip to the pumpkin patch

Click on any photo to enlarge it, download it, or start the slide show.

Science research class publishes scientific journal

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The Upper School science research class has launched Elements, an annual publication showcasing student research. The publication's mission is to increase awareness about what a scientific research project entails, and to create a hub where our community’s researchers can learn, ask questions, collaborate, and see their hard work in a formal science journal format. The inaugural edition features the work of students in the classes of 2013 through 2016.

Open the PDF below.

Lemelson-MIT program announces $10,000 grant to student engineering project

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Congratulations, engineers!

Catlin Gabel’s Global Community Engineering Club is one of 15 teams across the country that was awarded $10,000 through the Lemelson-MIT 2013-14 InvenTeam initiative. Thanks to the grant, the team now takes the new name, Catlin Gabel InvenTeam.

The Catlin Gabel project, ScumBot, addresses the real-world problem of duckweed infestation in Aspen Lake in Sunriver, Oregon. ScumBot is an autonomous robot that propels itself around inland bodies of water collecting algae and duckweed and depositing that cargo in designated areas. With the grant money, the team will work to build the Scumbot under the leadership of Alexandra Crew '16, president; Anna Dodson ‘16, communications manager; Max Armstrong '15, mechanical manager; Jacob Bendicksen '16, control systems manager; and Vincent Miller '15, software manager. For more about the project visit the Catlin Gabel InvenTeam website

A respected panel of invention and academic leaders from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), the Lemelson-MIT Program, industry, and InvenTeam student alumni selected the InvenTeams from a national pool of applicants.

Members of Catlin Gabel’s InvenTeam will travel to MIT’s EurekaFest  in June to present their project, meet other teams, get behind-the-scenes tours of MIT labs, and engage in hands-on challenges.

Dale Yocum is the dedicated faculty advisor of Catlin Gabel’s InvenTeam. “InvenTeams isn't a competition, it's more of a celebration of the creative spirit,” said Dale.

“Our team is thankful for the support of Lemelson-MIT in bettering our local Oregon community through invention,” said CG InvenTeam president Alexandra Crew. “We are proud to be doing our part to help the environment.”


Alumni Weekend 2013 Photo Gallery

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Alumni Lunch and Celebration of Leadership and Service

On Friday, September 27, alumni from the classses of 1933 – 1958 came to campus to have lunch in the new Creative Artst Center and to celebrate our school's history.

On Saturday, September 28, we presented Distinguished Alumni Awards to Gretchen Corbett '63, Willard "Wick" Rowland '62, and Amani Reed '93. We also honored retired teacher Dave Corkran, recipient of the Joey Day Pope '54 Volunteer Award.

Click on any photo to enlarge it, download it, or start a slide show.

Catlin Gabel names Timothy Bazemore new head of school

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Board chair Steve Gordon's letter to the community

Dear Catlin Gabel community members,

At the recommendation of the head search committee and on behalf of the board of trustees, I am delighted to announce that we have appointed Timothy Bazemore the next head of Catlin Gabel School.

Tim is currently the head of school at New Canaan Country School, a preschool–grade 9 coed school for 630 students in Connecticut. He is a proven leader with invaluable experience as both a classroom teacher and an administrator in independent schools. He brings to Catlin Gabel an exceptional background in progressive education and commitment to our lasting values: diversity, sustainability, and innovation in the classroom. During his interactions with the search committee, board, students, parents, faculty-staff, and alumni Tim demonstrated outstanding communication and interpersonal skills with wisdom and humanity. We are confident that Catlin Gabel will continue to serve as a national model for progressive education and to flourish in ways that are right for our school under Tim’s leadership.

Tim will begin his tenure as head of school on July 1, 2014. We look forward to a seamless transition, thanks to Lark Palma’s continuing leadership, our strong and seasoned administrative team, and our world-class faculty and staff.

“I am tremendously excited and honored to join the Catlin Gabel community next year,” wrote Tim. “During the search process, I was impressed by the energy, joy, and sense of purpose shared by everyone I met on campus. Under Lark Palma’s inspired leadership, the faculty and staff have created an extraordinary learning environment. I look forward to working in partnership with teachers and parents to ensure that every Catlin Gabel student benefits from a dynamic progressive education in the years ahead.”

Tim has been the head of New Canaan Country School since 2000. Through his work as vice chair of the Independent School Data Exchange (INDEX), Tim is leading the national conversation about progressive education and student skills assessment. Born and raised in Lewiston, New York, Tim graduated from Hotchkiss School in 1978. He earned a BA in history from Middlebury College and an MA in history from the University of Pennsylvania. He began his career as a 6th–12th grade humanities teacher at Chestnut Hill Academy, a K–12 school of 550 students in Philadelphia. During his 13 years with Chestnut Hill, Tim assumed increasing responsibility, moving from classroom teacher to director of middle and upper school admission, and then to head of the middle school. He and his wife, Lisa, have two sons, Luke, 15, and Tyler, 23.

The board and I are extremely grateful to the head search committee, chaired by Peter Steinberger, for leading a meticulous and inclusive process in which all voices were heard.

Thank you to the many parents, faculty, staff, students, alumni, and friends who participated by attending presentations and providing feedback. Community devotion to Catlin Gabel’s future was fully evidenced by your more than 1,000 survey responses, all of which the search committee read thoroughly.

We look forward to welcoming Tim and his family to Portland and Catlin Gabel.

Sincerely,
Steve Gordon, MD, board chair

>Link to Oregonian article

Caller magazine obit correction for Richard Abel

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Regretfully, Richard Abel's obituary listing in the Caller magazine omitted his first name. We will run this correction in the next edition.

Richard Abel
Father of Kit Abel Hawkins ’65 & Corinne Abel Bacher ’75;
grandfather of Will Hawkins ’97, Alex Bacher ’06, Eloise Bacher ’07 & Beatrix Bacher ’10



Alumni News, Summer 2013

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From the Summer 2013 Caller

The 2012–13 school year has come to a close, giving the alumni relations office time to reflect on a busy and exciting past year. Owen Gabbert ’02, alumni association board president, formally inducted 76 graduating seniors into the Catlin Gabel Alumni Association at commencement in June. The class of 2013 joins over 4,000 Catlin Gabel alumni around the globe who continue to stay connected to one another and the school.
 

Congratulations, Class of 2013!

The alumni association celebrated the class of 2013 at the senior picnic before graduation. This tradition allows seniors to get to know alumni board members before the seniors are formally inducted into the alumni association. Debbie Ehrman Kaye ’73, Courtney Mersereau ’99, and Peter Bromka ’00 spoke to the seniors about what it means to be alumni of Catlin Gabel. Debbie noted, “Though I graduated 40 years ago, we have walked the same paths and even had some of the same teachers: Ron Sobel, Mr. D., Bob Kindley. . . . The most important thing we have in common is that we have all received an excellent education and learning skills to take with us into the world, and lifelong friendships.”
 

Alumni Association Year at a Glance

The alumni association sponsored 13 events during the 2012–13 academic year, connecting over 400 alumni across the country. Highlights include the annual young alumni mixer over Thanksgiving break with 100 alumni, the New York City mixer with 25 alumni (ranging in class years from 1975 to 2008), last fall’s reunions, and our recent Portland event. Blake Nieman-Davis ’88 hosted the Portland event at his clothing store, Blake, where 30 alumni enjoyed learning about Tuition on the Track from its 2013 co-leaders, Max Meyerhoff ’13 and Mira Hayward ’13.
 

Alumni Weekend 2013

Alumni Weekend is set for September 27–28. The alumni association is looking forward to seeing you back on campus for the weekend’s festivities. Reunion celebrations will take place for classes ending in 3 and 8. Our alumni award recipients this year are Gretchen Corbett ’63, for distinguished alumni achievement; Wick Rowland ’62, for distinguished alumni service; Amani Reed ’92, as a distinguished younger alumnus; and Dave Corkran, honored with the Joey Day Pope ’54 volunteer award.
 

Alumni Weekend Activities

Friday, September 27
• Reunion luncheon: honoring classes 1938–1958
• Homecoming: visit campus and support our varsity soccer teams
• Homecoming party: celebrate in the Barn with the entire Catlin Gabel community
Saturday, September 28
• Alumni soccer game: always fierce but friendly
• Celebration of leadership and service: annual alumni awards
• Reunions: for ’63, ’68, ’73, ’78, ’83, ’88, ’93, ’98, ’03, ’08

We look forward to seeing you on campus in the fall for Alumni Weekend!
Susie Greenebaum ’05, associate director of alumni relations, greenebaums@catlin.edu
Owen Gabbert ’02, alumni board president
 
Members of the class of 2005 at the NYC regional alumni event in May, L to R: Lizzy Cooke, Josey Bartlett, Susie Greenebaum, Ted Lane, Nina Yonezawa, Emily Taylor, Alec Bromka, Lindsay Mandel, Jimmy Coonan

Farewell to our Retirees

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From the Summer 2013 Caller

Ron Sobel retired after 42 years at the school. Although most recently he has taught Upper School Spanish, he has taught several other subjects in both Upper and Middle School; served as head of the Middle School; directed admission and financial aid, international programs, and summer programs; and coached several sports. For many students and alumni, Ron was a huge part of Catlin Gabel.
 
“Catlin Gabel has been a very large part of my life both personal and professional. I began here as a young enthusiastic recent college graduate and spent much of my life on this campus. I have always loved it here, and am so appreciative of what the school has given my family and me. I shall miss the daily inspiration and laughter of my colleagues and students, and of course this amazing piece of land, which I have had the privilege of calling home for much more than half my life,” he says.
 
As for his retirement plans, Ron thinks he may become active in the National Association on Mental Illness’s program that supports families who struggle with adult mentally ill loved ones. “All kinds of things are flying through my head as great possibilities,” he says.
 
Michael de Forest retired after 17 years of teaching Lower School wood shop. “Wow!” wrote Michael. “Seventeen years at Catlin Gabel! I never imagined I would teach my craft in such an exceptional place. I have found eager girls and boys coming into our space enthusiastic about learning and making things. Almost every child I have met in our woodshop couldn’t wait to create! What a great setup for a teacher.”
 
Allen Schauffler retired after 45 years at Catlin Gabel. Since coming to the school in 1968 she has taught preschool and kindergarten as well as 1st, 2nd, and 3rd grades, and served in many positions, including acting Beginning School head and director of multicultural affairs.
 
“I have loved being so well supported professionally. I have loved spending my days with so many good, kind, sharp, funny, generous, flexible, professional, sometimes off-the-wall kids and adults who are embarked on a journey that I find endlessly fascinating—with all its twists and turns. And when in need, I have loved knowing that the wagons were circled,” she says.
 
“I have helped to launch, formally, something over 880 kids and who knows how many others around the edges,” she says. “I have written at least twice that many reports. I have held the hands of parents through naughty child moments, great highs, great lows, births, deaths of pets and close family, divorces, and, yes, even in vitro fertilizations. With the help of fabulous colleagues with whom I have disagreed, agreed, fought, and danced, I raised my children here. So, thanks for a most enlightening experience. It has played a huge role in shaping who I am.”
 

Creativity—The Commerce of the 21st Century

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From the Summer 2013 Caller

By Nance Leonhardt

When people ask me what my best subject was in school, they don’t expect me to say science. Although I’d always loved making art, when I grew up I’d planned to be a veterinarian or a zoologist. My high school offered an amazing science curriculum that was rich in experiential learning. From raising and training a baby goat in biology to using ballet to explore physics principles, science inspired my imagination.
 
Later when I began studying art intensively in college, it was the scientific aspects of the field, observation and engineering, that drew me down the rabbit hole. Watching chemistry transform the surface of silver gelatin-laced paper, soldering brass and copper fittings, devising a way to project video inside the pouch of a kangaroo—I love the problem-solving that artmaking requires.
 
Arts & Sciences: Blame it on Sputnik
In truth, art and science were inextricably linked for eons (#DaVinci). And yet somewhere between the Renaissance and modern times, the two fields diverged—at least in the United States. The sciences became the bailiwick of tomorrow, and the arts were relegated to an indulgent pastime.
 
I blame it on Sputnik. A lot happened to our country during the period between the industrial revolution and the space race. We outlawed child labor, we created a middle class, we mandated a free public education for all our nation’s children, and our national identity and economic welfare became tied to the outcome of our educational system.
 
In taking that penultimate step, we opened the dialogue about what the goal of our education should be. Late 19thcentury philosopher John Dewey maintained that schools should prepare students for participation in community and society. Curriculum and pedagogy should be emergent in that the school evolves and innovates around the climate of society. Dewey-based schools are often places where art and science coexist symbiotically and still occupy important real estate in the core curricula. Many independent schools, including Catlin Gabel, are deeply informed by Dewey’s original goals.
 
By contrast, public schools latched onto educational psychologist Edward Thorndike’s “law of effect.” A contemporary of Dewey with diametrically opposed views regarding the function of schooling, Thorndike believed skills and concepts must be laid out incrementally and mastered over a prescribed timeframe. Thorndike further posited that the function of schooling should be preparation for the workforce and that people should be trained along vocational tracks. Imagination had no place in Thorndike’s mechanized system—how could innovation be standardized or assessed?
 
STEM, STEAM, and the Teaching of Arts
We’ve all heard of STEM, a movement to improve the teaching of science, technology, engineering, and math. One of the core pieces of STEM philosophy is that 21st-century thinking will best be done by people who can engineer and research problems in order to develop solutions.
 
John Maeda, the president of the Rhode Island School of Design, has been a fervent advocate of converting STEM to STEAM—adding arts into the equation. The central tenets of his argument are that any advance is useless unless it can be communicated, and that flexible thinking, risk taking, and problem solving are essential to any kind of innovation. Those attributes are exactly what is nurtured in a rich and rigorous arts curriculum. In essence, Madea’s argument is that creativity will become the commerce of the 21st century.
 
The mechanics of art production are the methods for expressing ideas. Just as in organic chemistry or calculus, the greater your fluency is with the methods, the more you can bend it to explore ideas and concepts. As a society we have failed to take the fluency and methodology of the arts as seriously as literacy or numeracy. Students have not been given equal time to develop their arts skills so they can feel in command of those skills.
 
Building Skills, Drawing on Creativity
One of our jobs as arts educators is to give students command of the medium, whether that is playing an instrument, working in theater, controlling lenses and apertures in photography, or drawing. With continued scaffolding and building relationships with students, we can help them build skills over time, so that we see kids who can dig deep and explore huge ideas through these mediums.
 
A good arts education will help kids unpack the messaging that the culture gives them about societal norms and values. The work of Matt Junn ’13 is a shining example of that. He learned to render early on, but it took nurturing in the studio to get him to apply those skills to analyze a bigger idea (see his self-portrait at left). He’s now digging into his identity as a Korean American, learning to control and appropriate images to unpack what they mean to him and what is expected of him.
 
Elliot Eisner, a leading researcher in arts education at Stanford, gives strong arguments for the value of arts education that are relevant to our teaching—and the reasons why Catlin Gabel has just built a new Creative Arts Center.
 
• In the arts you can put together your work in an infinite variety of ways. The artist must make sense of these choices.
 
• In the arts, you can head in a direction, but when things happen along the way you have to make judgments to adapt. It can send you in a whole new direction. That’s innovation. It’s where you make a discovery (#breadmoldpenicillin).
 
• How something is said is part and parcel of what it says.
 
• We can experience things in art that go beyond what we can articulate. It helps us live in a bigger place. A recent exhibit at Mercy Corps featured a mural project where the faces of abused women in Rio de Janiero were phototransferred in giant scale on the buildings of the steeply terraced city by French artist JR. The images bore witness to the atrocities faced by women who had been formerly voiceless in that region, and change began to unfold.
 
• The arts are a special form of experience because of the intense engagement of the creator with the work. People think this is all art is, but it is just what makes it unique. The material resists you, and you have to get it to perform a task or deliver a message.
• Art must explore through the constraints of its mediums. If we don’t create possibilities for fluency in the range of mediums, we are preventing ourselves from living fully in the realm of big ideas and being able to solve problems creatively.
 
The Arts are Transformative
Just as babies are born with a scientist’s hunger for inquiry, so too are people are born to be creative. Equipping our students with a rigorous education in the arts teaches them about methodology, purpose, understanding their audience, and communicating that message. We arm them with guitars and hammers, poetry and cameras. We help them give form to ideas, to innovate and to connect. Our students will be the change in the 21st century.
 
Nance Leonhardt is Catlin Gabel’s Upper School media arts teacher and the head of the arts department.