Mathematics

Syndicate content

Woodshop K

Send by email
 
 
           Every Kindergartener starts the year by building a “no-measure” box.  Beginning with this project allows students time to develop and practice newly learned skills at their own pace.  The “no measure” title is slightly misleading in that students will use precut pieces of wood as measuring tools.  I refer to the precut pieces of wood as units.  Everyone starts with a 1 X 3½ X 34 inch board, which accommodates all five pieces when measured correctly.  This process allows the children to see how units link together, the basic concept of how a ruler works. Successfully building a 3-dimensional box reinforces how measurement determines accuracy, balance and success.
 
           The rest of the year focuses on individual and collaborative creations - except for our final boat project.  
 
       The goal for kindergarten woodshop is to try to build what ever is imagined. Sometimes I ask for a drawing of just the front view. The kindergartener typically thinks in 2-dimensions, so drawing the front view of their idea feels complete for them.  For instance, if their idea is a birdhouse, their drawing will help me visualize their thinking.  Do they envision a flat roof or a pitched roof?   Will there be a door? In order to decide the overall size of their idea, they hold their hands apart to indicate how wide and then how tall.  For each direction I use the tape measure to measure between their hands.  After they cut their first piece of wood I literally stand up that piece of wood up on the workbench to introduce and talk about a 3-dimensional perspective.  Understanding dimensions and perspective will continue to develop and strengthen as the students become comfortable working with the medium of wood.
 
            The kindergarten year in woodshop establishes a foundation for all kinds of creative thinking and empowers independence.  The finished work reveals a wide variety of understandings and creativity!  
 
            Some of the hand tools we use are: claw hammer, saw, coping saw, hand drill, brace drill, square, screw driver, sand paper, file, C-clamp, bar clamp and wood glue.

Calculus 1

Send by email

The main topics of Calculus I include limits, continuity, diffferentiation, and integration. Although this course is not considered an AP course, it should fully prepare students for the AP AB Calculus exam in the spring. Emphasis will be placed on demonstrating the connection between calculus and other subject areas, including physics, finance, and medicine.

 

Assessments will include group and individual projects, quizzes, and tests. Resources used throughout the course include textbooks, graphing calculators, and investigative labs.

Alg 2 / Geom Yr 2

Send by email
In this second part of the two-year Integrated Algebra 2/Geometry course, emphasis is placed on mathematical justification of algebraic and geometric properties. Many of the topics introduced in the previous year are revisited and expanded, with a focus on proving relationships and general principles deductively. Step-by-step, coordinate, paragraph, and indirect proofs are used. Algebra is employed throughout the course to solve geometric problems, work with series, and investigate exponential, logarithmic, and rational functions.
 
Assessments will include group and individual projects, daily homework assignments, quizzes, and tests. Resources used throughout the course include textbooks, graphing calculators, Geometer's Sketchpad, Moodle, Wiki, and addtional websites.
 
The accelerated version will cover the same material, as well as explore additional advanced topics. The pace of the accelerated course will also move considerably faster, as the class meets four times per week rather than five.

Descriptive Statistics

Send by email

The Descriptive Statistics course introduces many essential topics of statistics. The students learn how to produce data through surveys, experiments, and observational studies. They then analyze the data through graphical and numerical summaries. The students next learn to model data, using basic probability and sampling distributions. And, with time permitting, the students discover how to draw conclusions from data using confidence intervals and significance tests.

The students learn when and how to use technology to aid in solving statistical problems. Furthermore, they produce convincing oral and written statistical arguments, using appropriate terminology. Most importantly, they become critical consumers of published statistical results by heightening their awareness of ways in which statistics can be improperly used to mislead, confuse, and distort the truth.

Assessments will include group and individual projects, daily homework assignments, quizzes, and tests. Resources used throughout the course include textbooks, graphing calculators, Fathom, and addtional websites, including statistical applets and Gallup.

Acc Precalculus

Send by email

Please refer to the description of the Precalculus course. This accelerated version will cover the same material, as well as explore additional advanced topics. The pace of this course will also move considerably faster.

Honors Statistics

Send by email

Please refer to the description of the Descriptive Statistics course. This accelerated version will cover the same material, in addition to many more topics. These more advanced topics will include the following:

  • a more indepth discussion of linear regression
  • transformations, including square root and logarithmic
  • confidence intervals and inference tests for proportions and means
  • the chi-square test
  • inference for regression

This course will move at an extremely fast pace, in preparation for the AP Statistics exam in the spring.

Alg 2 / Geom Yr 1

Send by email

In this first part of the two-year Integrated Algebra 2/Geometry course, emphasis is placed on discovery and developing intuition for algebraic and geometric properties. Many new topics are introduced this year, with a focus on finding patterns and making conjectures through inductive reasoning, rather than through formal proof. Algebra is employed throughout the course to solve geometric problems, work with sequences, and investigate exponential and power functions. Heavy emphasis is placed on the connection between algebra and geometry through the study of transformation of functions. 

Assessments will include group and individual projects, daily homework assignments, quizzes, and tests. Resources used throughout the course include textbooks, graphing calculators, Geometer's Sketchpad, Moodle, Wiki, and addtional websites.
 
The accelerated version will cover the same material, as well as explore additional advanced topics. The pace of the accelerated course will also move considerably faster, as the class meets four times per week rather than five.

Mathematics 6

Send by email

6th Grade is a time when all of the basic math skills will be solidified, strengthened and deepened. In tandem with this basic skills development will be an emphasis on creative problem-solving strategies and generalizing patterns to push the growth of each child's abstract thinking and logical reasoning ability. The beginning of algebraic thinking will be woven throughout the curriculum. Saxon Math is the textbook that we use in 6th-8th grade as the backbone of our math curriculum. It is designed with a spiraling approach so that topics are introduced over a period of time and continue to be reinforced consistently throughout the year and over the 3 years. In addition to Saxon math, we supplement with a variety of materials and a variety of approaches since no single method is effective for every child. To balance the direct instructional style of Saxon math, Connected Math's student-directed curriculum will be integrated into the overall 6th grade math program. In addition, the students will be introduced to some computer programming during our gender-based grouping in the spring.