History 8

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During the fall civics unit, students study the roots of U.S. democracy and the founding documents, then relate them to contemporary issues, events, and elections. Students prepare for and carry out formal debates on a variety of topics. There is also a recitation as part of the unit. Curriculum focuses on the founding of the United States. Students examine how strong feelings about individual rights influenced the establishment of the United States as a new nation. Close analysis of the founding documents allows students to see how themes from the 18th century world resonate today.

Winter term focuses on the Holocaust of World War II. Issues of identity, scapegoating, human rights, and a world in flux are central to the unit. The study is linked with the English curriculum as we examine the event from different viewpoints.

For spring term, students tirn to global themes. From the United Nations and European Union to emerging nations, minority rights, and economics, the class takes a broad view of the role of the United States in the modern world. Research skills, source evaluation, thoughtful participation in discussions, writing with increased focus and depth, preparing well for recitations, and showing consideration for various viewpoints are expected and supported.

For this latter part of the  year, students look at the emergence of the United States in the second half of the 20th century as a dominant world power. The responsibility of, and challenges to that dominance, is central to course themes. Case studies of various nations help students understand some of the complexities the interaction of nations bring. Deepening student understanding of an American citizen's place in the world will be ongoing through the course as well.

To see the History 8 Curriculum Map, follow this link:

http://www.catlin.edu/middle-school/curriculum/course/history

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Photo Gallery: 
Branches of Gov't Cartoon
Branches of Gov't Cartoon
Internet Privacy
Internet Privacy
Boston Massacre
Boston Massacre
Colonial Life
Colonial Life
US Constitution
US Constitution
Signing the Constitution
Signing the Constitution
Benjamin Franklin
Benjamin Franklin
Jamestown Colony
Jamestown Colony
Signing Magna Carta in England
Signing Magna Carta in England
John Adams
John Adams
Marbury and Madison
Marbury and Madison
Powers of Congress
Powers of Congress
Preamble of Constitution
Preamble of Constitution
Republican Government
Republican Government
Writing the Constitution
Writing the Constitution
Patriotic Woman
Patriotic Woman
Thomas Jefferson
Thomas Jefferson
Henry David Thoreau on Government
Henry David Thoreau on Government
George Washington
George Washington
We the People....
We the People....
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