Day 6...the monotony finally ends

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While it may appear as though I have not been blogging "enough", I can tell you it was for good reason. Today is Day 6, and since I last shared with you my daily activities, I  have done nothing new. For the past two work days, I have monotonously been tallying the responses  generated by over 500 Adidas Wear Test Samples. The responses are from TEENAGE GIRLS (ages 15-18) mind you, and they can get excessively wordy. They all seemed to think that their opinion mattered more than everyone elses. It is interesting how one can learn things about human psycology while obstinately recording how well sports performance garments were received by the public. Anyway, day 6 comes as a relief simply because it means I can get back to the interesting stuff. I have watched the Derrick Rose "Unleash the Bull" commercial about 5 times this morning. More like listened actually. Why you might ask? Well, the music in the background happens to be created by underground music producer AraabMusik. THE EXACT SAME producer that was featured in Under Armour's Cam Newton advertisement. While most sports ads these days tend to feature either hip hop or electronic music vibes, I am still attempting to understand the fascination with AraabMusik? What does he represent for the sports industry? (I highly recommend watching the ad which I have linked below, it's full of interesting motifs geared towards sports fans. His name is Rose and there are rose petals, he plays for the Chicago Bulls and he is depicted in bull-like fashion). 

 www.youtube.com/watch

^"Unleash the Bull commercial

^AraabMusik in Under Armour commercial 

Considering he is an underground artist, rather than a mainstream one (like Katy Perry and B.o.B, both of whom are spokespeople for Adidas "All In" campaign), I am thinking that maybe sports companies are suspecting that helping a popular artist like Araab to surface into the mainstream music industry, could be beneficial for both parties. By intertwining the two at an early stage, perhaps they hope to create a popular joint-conception (if you will) between Araab and Adidas down the road. I guess this makes sense, especially for athletic teenage consumers like myself.

Anyway, for the rest of today my goal is to search for advertisements that target kids ages 12 and under. I am finding that these ads are significantly more difficult to find, but it should be an interesting process. I will be presenting all of my findings by the end of the week.  I am looking forward to honing my presentation skills as i know I will be talking in front of larger audiences at USC.